Hemophagocytic Lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) complicating the double trouble of Malaria and Kala-azar - a rare presentation

Texto

(1)

CMRA

 ‐

MS

 ‐

Author

 

Manuscript

CMRA

 ‐ 

MS

 ‐

Author

 

Manuscript

CMRA Public Access

Case Report

MS. 2015 Dec; 3(4):288-292

 

A

 

Pubmedhouse

 

Journal

        

Medical

 

Science

  

The

 

Official

 

Publication

 

of

 

CMRA

 

Hemophagocytic

 

Lymphohistiocytosis

 

(HLH)

 

complicating

 

the

 

double

 

trouble

 

of

 

Malaria

 

and

        

Kala

azar

 ‐ 

a

 

rare

 

presentation.

 

 

Dr. Gian Chand, Dr. Ajay Chhabra, Dr. Pritam Singh Sandhu, Dr. Hardip Singh Nirman, Dr. Smit Rajput, Dr. Deepshikha Mangat

References This article cites 21 articles some of which you can access for free at Pubmed Central

Permissions To obtain permission for the commercial use or material from this paper, please write - editors@pubmedhouse.com

You can respond www.pubmedhouse.com/journals/ms/contact us

to this article at

Downloaded from www.pubmedhouse.com/journals/ms/

PLEASE SCROLL DOWN TO READ THE ARTICLE

(2)

       

 

H

c

a

Ch

    

CASE REP

Hemoph

omplica

and Kala

hand G1, Chha

Corresponde

 2

Dr. Ajay Chh

Medicine,

1

Dr. Gian Cha

Medicine, 3

Dr. Pritam Si

Medicine,

4

Dr. Hardip S

of Medicine,

5

Dr. Smit Rajp

Medicine,

6

Dr. Deepshikh

Department of

All authors ar

Government M

Editors for t

 

Dr. A.K. Pradh Editor-in-Chie

Dr. Arnab Gho Editorial board

Cite this art Chand G, Chh Mangat D. He complicating t a rare presenta

 

Information

Received: Aug

Revised: Oct.1

Accepted: Dec

Published onl

PORT

hagocyti

ating th

a azar

-abra A2, Sand

ence to:

habra, MD, Assi

and, MD, Associ

ingh Sandhu, M

Singh Nirman, M

put, MBBS, Resi

ha Mangat, MB f Microbiology,

re affiliated to

Medical College,

this Article: 

han, MBBS, MD ef, Medical Scien

osh, MBBS, MD d member, Medi

ticle: 

habra A, Sandhu emophagocytic L the double troub ation. Medical Sc

about the arti

g 27, 2015 11, 2015 c. 14, 2015

line: Dec. 30, 20

ic Lymp

he doub

a rare

dhu PS3, Nirm

istant Professor, D

iate Professor, De

D, Professor, De

MD, Assistant Pro

ident Doctor, Dep

BS, Resident Do

Amritsar, Punjab

D. Professor, KIM nce.

D, Professor, Pat ical Science.

PS, Nirman HS Lymphohistiocyt le of Malaria an cience. 2015, 3(4 icle

015

phohisti

le troub

present

man HS4, Rajp

Department of

epartment of

epartment of

ofessor, Departm

partment of

octor,

b, India

MS, Amalapuram

thology, MCOM

, Rajput S, tosis (HLH) nd Kala-azar -

4):288-92.

ocytosi

ble of M

tation

ut S5, Mangat

ment

m,

MS,

A

He inf ina ph clin HL ba rep vis Bo

 

Ke

Fev He

s ( HLH)

Malaria

t D6

b stra c t

emophagocytic 

flammatory  s

appropriate  p agocytize hem nical picture of LH  can be pri cteria, viruses, port of simulta sceral leishman order Security F

ey words

ver, hemophag patosplenome

)

lymphohistioc

syndrome  w

proliferation  o matopoietic cell f fever, hepato imary or  seco

 parasites and  aneous infecti niasis complica Force jawan (BS

gocytic lympho galy, kala‐azar,

cytosis (HLH) i hich  is  cha of  lympho‐his

s and thereby  splenomegaly  ondary  due  to

fungi. Here we on of Plasmod

ated by secon SF soldier). 

histiocytosis (H , malaria. 

s a rare hype aracterized  b tiocytes  whic give rise to th and cytopenia o infections b e present a cas

dium vivax an ndary HLH in 

HLH), 

(3)

Online Submis Contact Us: ed An official jour

       

Background

Indian  subcon diseases. Mala India account from Southeas productive ye years and he caused by Pla Malarial infect systemic inflam Visceral leishm is a vector bor and spleen. It spread by fem two thirds of t to find infectio time,  especia complications 

response  cau

presenting cel parasitic  illne complicating t Here we pres parasites whi HLH. 

 

Case Report

 

A  31  year  o Jharkhand,  In presented to B grade  fever a duration. Ther burning  mict headache or v showed troph anti‐malarial t Even  after  c continued to  103⁰F on mo suddenly had

complete  b

thrombocytop

Government M

of persisting fe He presented  complaint of  pressure of 12 rate of 20/m

moderate am

clubbing, no  Liver  was  pa

ssions: pubmed ditors@pubme

rnal of CMRA  

d

ntinent  is  ho aria is the mos ing for more t st Asia. It occu ars leading to nce has grave

asmodium spe

tion by P. viva

mmatory resp maniasis or kal rne illness whi t is caused by male Phleboto

the global burd on with both in ally  in  endem [3].  HLH  is used  by  exc lls. Secondary  esses.  There 

the double inf sent a rare c ch was comp

t

old  BSF  sold ndia,  with  re BSF base hosp associated wi re was no hist urition,  skin  vomiting. His p

ozoites of P. v

treatment wit completing  th

remain febrile ost of  the occ d  an  episode  blood  count  penia and leuc Medical Colleg ever and low b to us in the o fever. Physica 24/78 mm Hg,  min and a tem mount of pallo lymphadenopa alpable  with 

dhouse.com/jo edhouse.com   

      

ome  to  a  lot  t common vec than 3/4th of t rs mostly in yo o a loss of disa e economic c ecies spread 

ax and P. falcip

onse and mult la‐azar as it is 

ch affects the  y Leishmania d

mus sand fly.  den of kala‐aza n the same ind mic  regions  re s  a  multi‐syst essive  stimul

HLH complica has  been  no fection of mal

ase of infecti plicated by th

ier,  native  o cent  visit  to  ital with chief  th  chills and  ory of cough w

eruptions,  a eripheral bloo

vivax. He was s th chloroquine he  course  of e with a temp casions. On  t of epistaxis. 

which  re

openia. He wa ge and Hospita blood counts.  outpatient dep al examination pulse rate of 9 mperature of 

or,  no  icterus athy and no  a  span  of  16

ournals      

               Hemop

© 2015.CM

of  vector  b ctor borne illne the cases repo oung adults in  ability adjusted

onsequences.  by mosquito 

parum may lea ti‐organ failure

commonly kn

bone marrow 

donovanii whi India account ar [2].  It is not ividual at the s esulting  in  va

tem  inflamma

ation  of  ant tes many vira o  report  of  aria and kala‐ ion with both

e developmen

of  district  Du his  native  p complaints of 

rigors  of  2  with expectora

ltered  sensor od film examina

started on stan e and primaq f  chloroquine perature of aro the fourth da

This  prompte

evealed  ane

as then referre al, Amritsar in 

artment with  n revealed a b

96/min, respira 103⁰F. There  s, no cyanosis peripheral ed 6cm,  was  so

                     

phagocytic Lym

 

MRA, All right

borne  ess in  orted  their  d life  It is  bite.  ad to  e [1].  

own,  liver  ch is  ts for  t rare  same  rious  atory  tigen  l and  HLH 

‐azar.  h the  nt of 

mka,  place  f high  days  ation,  rium,  ation  ndard  uine.  e  he  ound  y he  ed  a  emia,  ed to  view 

chief  blood  atory  was  s, no  ema.  ft  in 

cons belo a  h 180 0.9m tran seru urea pho anti cou g/dL Urin cou he b card was mar hem show     Figu mac   He  20m febr 290 was App seco injec ster 8.0g 140, ster wer an H 160,

                 Medica

mphohistiocyto

ts reserved 

sistency and n ow costal marg

hemoglobin  1

0/mm3,  plate

mg/dL,  aspa

nsaminase 26  um protein 8.5

a 26 mg/dL.  sphatase defi biotics and ar nts. Blood inv L, TLC of 2100 ne and blood c

rse of anti‐ma belonged to k d test (testing 

 done and bot rrow examinat

mophagocytic 

wing engulfed

ure  1  ‐  Bo crophage with 

was  started  mg/kg/day intra

rile and his he 0/mm3 and p

 increased (42 plying the Histi ondary HLH w

ctable  dexam

roids  blood  co g/dL,  TLC  o

,000/mm3 and roids were con

e slowly tape Hb of 11.2 g/d

,000/mm3. 

       IS al Science 201

osis in Malaria

non‐tender. Sp gin. His initial  10.7g/dL,  tot elet  count  43

artate  transa

U/L, lactate de 5 g/dL, serum 

Patient was n cient.  Patient rtesunate and  estigations on 0/mm3 and pla

ultures were s alarials patient ala‐azar endem

rK39 antigen th of which ca tion was done 

syndrome 

platelets, leuc

one  marrow 

engulfed leuc

on sodium  st amuscular for  emoglobin had

latelets were  57 ng/ml).  ocyte Society, was kept and  methasone.  Aft

ounts  started of  3900/mm3  d the patient  ntinued for ano

red and stopp dL, TLC 6500 /

SSN 2321‐5291 5;3(4):288‐292

a and Kalaaza

pleen was also  blood investig tal  leukocyte  3,000/mm3,  se

aminase  31

ehydrogenase 

albumin 3.2 g not found to  t  was started  was followed  n day ten reve atelet count o terile. Inspite o t continued to mic regions of ) and a leishm ame out to be 

which reveale with  many  cocytes and RB

examination cocytes 

tibogluconate  28 days. He c d fallen to 6.8

50,000/mm3. 

 2004 criteria  the patient w ter  5  days  o

  improving  w and  platel became afeb other week af ped. He was d mm3 and a pla

1   2

ar  

289

palpable 9 cm gations showed count  (TLC erum  bilirubin

U/L,  alanine

275 U/L, tota g/dL and blood

be glucose‐6 on injectable up with blood ealed Hb of 6.8 of 30,000/mm3

of receiving fu o be febrile. A f India, a rapid mania antibody positive. Bone ed a picture o

macrophage BCs (Figure‐1).

showing  a

at a dose o ontinued to be 8g/dL, TLC wa

Serum ferritin

a possibility o was started on of  starting  the with  an Hb  o

let  count  o brile. Injectable

fter which they discharged with atelet count o

(4)

Online Submissions: pubmedhouse.com/journals       ISSN 2321‐5291   Contact Us: editors@pubmedhouse.com       Medical Science 2015;3(4):288‐292  An official journal of CMRA       Hemophagocytic Lymphohistiocytosis in Malaria and Kalaazar  

       

 

© 2015.CMRA, All rights reserved 

 

Discussion

 

 

Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis  

HLH is a life threatening hyper‐inflammatory consequence of  many underlying conditions and can affect any age group [4].  HLH was earlier thought to be a sporadic disease caused by  proliferation of histiocytes. Afterwards a familial variety of  HLH  was  described.  However,  in  1965  simultaneous  development of fatal  HLH in a father  and his son was  reported  which  suggested  that  infection  could  be  the  underlying  etiology [5]. Non‐familial variety  of  HLH is  a  consequence of a rampant inflammatory response to an  infective agent in most cases [6]. Incessant stimulation of  histiocytes and lymphocytes leads to excessive production of  cytokines which result in the peculiar symptoms of HLH, 

namely  fever,  hepatosplenomegaly,  cytopenias  and 

hemophagocytosis [5]. Hemophagocytosis is a pathological  finding of activated macrophages, engulfing erythrocytes,  leucocytes, platelets, and their precursor cells and thereby  leading to  cytopenias  [7].  The syndrome  occurs due  to  defective cytotoxic activity of natural killer (NK) cells and  cytotoxic  T‐lymphocytes  which  become  excessive  and  uncontrolled with ineffective clearance of antigen along with  excessive aggregation of activated T lymphocytes, histiocytes  and macrophages in response to infective stimulus [8].  

 

Etiology 

HLH can be primary or secondary. Primary HLH which is a  familial  erythrophagocytic  lymphohistiocytosis  is  an  autosomal recessive disorder with various genetic mutations  and is generally seen in childhood and infancy. It can be a  part of immune deficiency syndrome. Secondary HLH occurs  after immunological activation following systemic infection,  immunological  deficiency  or  due  to  an  underlying  malignancy.   Amongst the infectious causes of HLH viral  infections mainly Epstein‐Barr virus (EBV), Cytomegalovirus  (CMV), measles, adenovirus are pre‐dominant pathogens [9]. 

Other  infections  include  Gram  negative  bacteria, 

tuberculosis, malaria, leishmania, leptospira, brucella and  fungal infections. There have been few case reports of HLH  complicating leishmaniasis [10‐16] and HLH complicating P.  vivax [17‐19]. Double infection with leishmaniasis and P.  vivax complicated by HLH has not been reported in literature  though a double infection with leishmaniasis and EBV has  been reported which prompted this case report [20]. 

 

Diagnostic dilemma 

Our case presented with fever, hepatosplenomegaly and  pancytopenia with peripheral blood smear suggestive of P.  vivax malaria and failure to improve with therapy prompted  us to further investigate the patient. He was simultaneously  harboring an infection with leishmania as well, diagnosis of 

which would have been a rare possibility in northern India.  History of his stay at Jharkhand (which is an endemic region  of kala‐azar) made us suspect and investigate for the same.  There was evidence of hemophagocytosis on bone marrow  examination (Figure 1) and hyper‐ferritinemia. The patient  fulfilled  the  diagnostic  criteria  (Table  1)  laid  down  by  Histiocyte Society’s HLH study group [20]. 

 

 

Even after giving full treatment with anti‐malarials and anti‐ leishmanial agent patient’s blood counts continued to fall. So 

to  check  the  uncontrolled  hyperinflammatory  state 

corticosteroids were started. After five days of starting the  corticosteroids patient’s counts started rising and the fever  subsided. In most of the cases treatment of the inciting  cause is sufficient and aborts the hyper‐inflammatory state  but  rarely  there  may  be  need  of  immune‐suppressive  therapy as in our case [9, 21]. 

 

Conclusion

 

 

This case report is to highlight the fact that double infection  with  P.  vivax  and  leishmania  although rare  in  endemic  regions and in the setting of unresolving fever, cytopenias  and hepatosplenomegaly even after a proper course of anti‐ microbials, a possibility of HLH should be considered. If left  unrecognized and untreated, it can be fatal.  

 

Abbreviations

 

 

Cytomegalovirus  (CMV),  Epstein‐Barr  virus  (EBV), 

Hemophagocytic  lymphohistiocytosis  (HLH),  natural  killer  (NK) cells, total leukocyte count (TLC). 

 

Table 1. HLH diagnostic criteria, 2009[19] 

1. Molecular diagnosis of hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) or 

X‐linked lymphoproliferative syndrome (XLP). 

2. Or at least 3 of 4:

      a. Fever

      b. Splenomegaly

      c. Cytopenias (minimum 2 cell lines reduced)

         d. Hepatitis

3. And at least 1 of 4:

         a. Hemophagocytosis

         b. Raised Ferritin

         c. Raised sIL2R* (age based) 

         d. Absent or very decreased NK function 

4. Other results supportive of HLH diagnosis: 

        a. Hypertriglyceridemia

        b. Hypofibrinogenemia

        c. Hyponatremia

(5)

Online Submissions: pubmedhouse.com/journals       ISSN 2321‐5291   Contact Us: editors@pubmedhouse.com       Medical Science 2015;3(4):288‐292  An official journal of CMRA       Hemophagocytic Lymphohistiocytosis in Malaria and Kalaazar  

       

 

© 2015.CMRA, All rights reserved 

291

 

Competing

 

interests

 

 

None declared. 

 

Authors’

 

contribution

 

 

The first four authors were the consultant physicians of the  patient and helped reach the diagnosis along with the help  of the Microbiologist Deepshikha Mangat. Dr. Smit Rajput  was attending postgraduate who was involved in patient  care.  

  

Authors’

 

information

 

 

Dr. Gian Chand is an Associate Professor, Department of  Medicine at Government Medical College, Amritsar. He has  many publications to his credit. 

 

Dr. Ajay Chhabra is an Assistant Professor of Medicine,  Government Medical  College,  Amritsar  and  is  an  active  member of the Medical Education Unit of the college. 

 

Dr.  Pritam  Singh  Sandhu  is  a  Professor  of  Medicine,  Government Medical College, Amritsar who is a member of  many societies and has many years of teaching experience in  the field of Medicine. 

 

Dr.  Hardip  Singh  Nirman  is  an  Assistant  Professor  of  Medicine, Government Medical College, Amritsar. 

 

Dr. Smit Rajput is a budding postgraduate, department of  Medicine. 

 

Dr. Deepshikha Mangat is a microbiologist at Government  Medical College, Amritsar. 

 

Acknowledgments

  

 

Authors are thankful to the patient and college authority. 

 

Reference

 

 

1. Kumar A, Valecha N, Jain T, Dash AP. Burden of  Malaria in India: Retrospective and Prospective View.  In: Breman JG, Alilio MS, White NJ, editors. Defining  and Defeating the Intolerable Burden of Malaria III:  Progress and Perspectives: Supplement to Volume  77(6) of American Journal of Tropical Medicine and  Hygiene.  Northbrook  (IL):  American  Society  of  Tropical Medicine and Hygiene; 2007 Dec.  

2. Bhunia GS, Kesari S, Chatterjee N, Kumar V, Das P.  The  Burden  of  Visceral  Leishmaniasis  in  India:  Challenges  in  Using  Remote  Sensing  and  GIS  to  Understand and Control. ISRN Infectious Diseases,  vol. 2013, Article ID 675846, 14 pages, 2013.  

3. van den Bogaart E, Berkhout MMZ, Adams ER, Mens  PF, Sentongo E et al.   Prevalence, Features and Risk  Factors for Malaria Co‐Infections amongst Visceral  Leishmaniasis  Patients  from  Amudat  Hospital,  Uganda. PLoS Negl Trop Dis 2012;6(4): e1617.  

4. Gritta  EJ,  Lehmberg  K.  Hemophagocytic 

lymphohistiocytosis:  pathogenesis  and  treatment.  ASH Education Program Book 2013;605‐11. 

5. Boake  WC,  Card  WH,  Kimmey  JF.  Histiocytic  medullary reticulosis: concurrence in father and son.  Arch Intern Med 1965;116:245‐52. 

6. Janka  G,  zur  Stadt  U.  Familial  and  acquired  hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis.  ASH Education  Program Book 2005;1:82‐8. 

7. Favara  B.  Hemophagocytic  lymphohistiocytosis:  a  Hemophagocytic  syndrome.  Semin  Diagn  Pathol  1992;9:63‐74. 

8. Rajadhyaksha A, Sonawale A, Agrawal A, Ahire K,  Kawale  J.  A  Case  Report  of  Hemophagocytic  Lymphohistiocytosis  (HLH).    J  Ass  Phy  India  2014;62(7):637‐41. 

9. George  MR.  Hemophagocytic  lymphohistiocytosis:  review of etiologies and management. J Blood Med  2014;5:69‐86.  

10. Marom D, Offer I, Tamary H, Jaffe CL, Garty BZ.  Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis associated with  visceral  leishmaniasis.  Pediatr  Hematol  Oncol.  2001;18(1):65‐70. 

11. Ozyurek  E,  Ozcay  F,  Yilmaz  B,  Ozbek  N.  Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis associated with  visceral leishmaniasis: a case report. Pediatr Hematol  Oncol. 2005;22(5):409‐14. 

12. Rajagopala S, Dutta U, Chandra KS, Bhatia P, Varma  N,  Kochhar  R.  Visceral  leishmaniasis  associated  hemophagocytic  lymphohistiocytosis  – case  report  and systematic review. J Infect. 2008;56(5):381‐8.   13. Tapisiz  A,  Belet  N,  Ciftci  E,  Ince  E,  Dogru  U. 

Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis associated with  visceral leishmaniasis. J Trop Pediatr. 2007;53(5):359‐ 61. 

14. Cancado GG, Freitas GG, Faria FH, de Macedo AV, 

Nobre  V.  Hemophagocytic  lymphohistiocytosis 

associated  with  visceral  leishmaniasis  in  late  adulthood. Am J Trop Med Hyg. 2013;88(3):575‐7.   15. Kilani B,  Ammari  L,  Kanoun F,  Ben Chaabane  T, 

(6)

Online Submissions: pubmedhouse.com/journals       ISSN 2321‐5291   Contact Us: editors@pubmedhouse.com       Medical Science 2015;3(4):288‐292  An official journal of CMRA       Hemophagocytic Lymphohistiocytosis in Malaria and Kalaazar  

       

 

© 2015.CMRA, All rights reserved 

 

16. Koubâa M, Mâaloul I, Marrakchi Ch, Mdhaffar M,  Lahiani D, Hammami B, Makni F, Ayedi A, Jemâa MB.  Hemophagocytic syndrome associated with visceral  leishmaniasis  in  an  immunocompetent  adult‐case  report and review of the literature. Ann Hematol.  2012;91(7):1143‐5.  

17. Bae E, Jang S, Park CJ, Chi HS. Plasmodium vivax 

malaria‐associated  hemophagocytic 

lymphohistiocytosis  in  a  young  man  with 

pancytopenia  and  fever.  Ann  Hematol. 

2011;90(4):491‐2.  

18. Sari Beyoglu ET, Anak S, Agaoglu L, Boral O, Unuvar A, 

Devecioglu  O.  Secondary  hemophagocytic 

lymphohistiocytosis induced by malaria infection in a  child  with  Langerhans  cell  histiocytosis.  Pediatr  Hematol Oncol. 2004;21(3):267‐72. 

19. Sung PS, Kim IH, Lee JH, Park JW. Hemophagocytic 

lymphohistiocytosis  (HLH)  associated  with 

Plasmodium vivax infection: case report and review  of the literature. Chonnam Med J. 2011;47(3):173‐6.   20. Filipovich  AH.  Hemophagocytic  lymphohistiocytosis 

(HLH) and  related  disorders. Hematology Am  Soc  Hematol Educ Program. 2009:127‐31.  

21. Koliou  MG,  Soteriades ES,  Ephros  M,  Mazeris  A,  Antoniou  M,  Elia  A  et  al.  Hemophagocytic  lym‐ phohistiocytosis associated with Epstein Barr virus  and Leishmania donovani coinfection in a child from  Cyprus. J Pediatr Hematol Oncol. 2008;30(9):704‐7. 

Imagem

Referências