Top PDF Traditional use of medicinal plants in a city at steppic character (M’sila, Algeria)

Traditional use of medicinal plants in a city at steppic character (M’sila, Algeria)

Traditional use of medicinal plants in a city at steppic character (M’sila, Algeria)

To improve knowledge on the use of plants cultivated or spontaneous an ethnobotanical survey in the city of M'sila was conducted during the period 2011-2012 in collaboration with traditional practitioners, herbalists and healers. All investigations described the information about: date, research area (district, village), informants (name, age, sex, educational level), scientific name of plant, local name of plant, part of the plant used, usage purpose of the plant, dosage, how to use it (decoction, infusion, etc.), usage period of the plant, side effects of the plant. A total of 85 adults, 50 women and 35 men, 10 of them are recognized as traditional healers were able to determine the species and answer questions about the traditional use of plants in artisanal processing, nutritional and medicinal domains.
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Medicinal plants used by “Passo da Ilha” rural community in the city of Pato Branco, southern Brazil

Medicinal plants used by “Passo da Ilha” rural community in the city of Pato Branco, southern Brazil

The scope of this work was to rescue and document the traditional knowledge regarding the medicinal plants used by Passo da Ilha rural community, in Pato Branco, Paraná State, Southern Brazil (26 ◦ 11 ′ S, 52 ◦ 36 ′ W and 760 m high). Structured interviews were made in field research with 16 informants who had the traditional knowledge about medicinal plants. The research was carried out from October to December 2000. The plants were collected in the field, identified and their vouchers were housed at the Herbarium “Irina Delanova De Gemtchjnicov” (BOTU) of São Paulo State University, in Botucatu. A total of 47 botanical families and 114 species of medicinal plants were identified. These plants were suitable for more than 30 different medicinal uses. The residents are mainly of European descent, which justify the presence of many exotic plants. The knowledge on how to use medicinal plants properly is held mainly by the females, and decreases in the newer generations, denoting “cultural erosion” in progress.
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Rev. esc. enferm. USP  vol.48 número especial

Rev. esc. enferm. USP vol.48 número especial

Ethnographic quesions of a descripive and exploratory character were used at the beginning of the interviews to fa- cilitate the expression of beliefs, values and daily pracices of the cultural group. The following quesions were presented: 1) Tell me about healthcare pracices present in your daily life related to yourself and the people who live with you. 2) In the event of disease, what did you learn about care and heal- ing pracices and use of medicinal plants for this objecive? 3) What do you take into account when caring for a disease at home, or do you think it is beter to look for help outside your home? 4) What resources do you seek in that case? 5) Tell me if you have ever felt any diference in treatment from health professionals because you are black.
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The use of medicinal plants by rural populations of the Pastaza province in the Ecuadorian Amazon

The use of medicinal plants by rural populations of the Pastaza province in the Ecuadorian Amazon

In Ecuador, 408 studies related to ethnobotanic areas have been registered. The Amazonian region shows 107 studies, mainly in fields like general ethnobotany, and medicinal and edible plants (Ríos et al. 2007).The highest number of species used in Ecuador are mainly from two families (Asteraceae and Fabaceae) and the principal uses are treatment of infections, wounds, injuries, stomach disorders (De la Torre et al.2008). Pastaza province, located at the Ecuadorian Amazon region, is home for the Achuar, Andowa, Huaorani, Kichwa, Shiwiar, Shuar and Zápara ethnic groups (Gobierno Autónomo Descentralizado Provincial de Pastaza 2011). In addition, there is a mestizo population in high percentage coming from other provinces. This fact generates the need to register the species used as medicinal plants according to the localities and ethnic groups within each of them. The objective of this research was to identify the plant species used as traditional medicine by farmers in Pastaza, Mera and Santa Clara localities in the Pastaza Province, Ecuador, establishing its use according to the localities, ethnicity and use purposes of the plants.
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Rev. bras. farmacogn.  vol.24 número4

Rev. bras. farmacogn. vol.24 número4

The gastrointestinal tract is one of the most important organs of the human body and is vulnerable to different diseases. Available drugs often have low efficacy or are associated with many adverse effects. Therefore, alternative drugs are necessary to treat gastrointestinal complications. This study intended to identify medicinal plants in Urmia, Iran, that can affect common gastrointestinal disorders and diseases. Data was collected from public resources via interviews and questionnaires applied from April to June 2013. Herbarium specimens were collected from the region and authenticated by a botanist. A total of 41 indigenous medicinal plants from the Urmia region, belonging to twenty families, have a traditional medicinal role in the treatment of parasitic and infectious diseases, diarrhea, reflux, gastroenteritis, peptic ulcer, constipation, bloating, among other gastrointestinal tract disorders. Analysis showed that most plants affecting the gastrointestinal tract belonged in the Asteraceae family (24%). The most used part of the plants was the seed at 17%. Decoction at 65% was the most popular form of treatment used. Some of the medicinal plants discussed in this article have new implications presented for the first time. Pharmacological studies on the therapeutic effects of the indigenous plants mentioned in this study are necessary in order to investigate their claimed clinical effects and the use of their effective compounds to produce natural and useful drugs. Currently, there is no data on the herbal plants used to treat gastrointestinal disorders in northwestern Iran. Therefore, these findings are important for the management of gastrointestinal disorders and to conduct future studies on traditional medicine for drug development.
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Braz. J. Pharm. Sci.  vol.47 número3

Braz. J. Pharm. Sci. vol.47 número3

Asthma is one of the most common chronic diseases worldwide (WHO, 2007). It is known that there is a particu- larly high frequency of use of herbal plants and traditional medicine among low-income populations, such as the pa- tients seen at the ProAR. Even among adults with free access to speciic treatment for asthma, the use of drugs and other non-prescribed products is common practice. A study by Blanc et al. (1997) showed an association of this practice to an increased risk of adverse reactions and treatment failure. In the present study, the authors observed a high con- sumption of medicinal plants. These patients receive their medications free through the Ministry of Health of Brazil and the Department of Health of the State of Bahia and are assisted by a multidisciplinary team comprising doctors, nurses, pharmacists, social workers and psychologists.
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TRADITIONAL USES OF MEDICINAL PLANTS IN TREATING SKIN DISEASES IN NAGAPATTINAM DISTRICT OF TAMILNADU, INDIA

TRADITIONAL USES OF MEDICINAL PLANTS IN TREATING SKIN DISEASES IN NAGAPATTINAM DISTRICT OF TAMILNADU, INDIA

An ethnomedicinal survey was undertaken to collect information from traditional use of the medicinal plants in Nagapattinam District of TamilNadu. Folk medicine has medicine has been used for thousands of years with significant contributions made by its practitioners to human health, particularly as primary health care providers at the community level 1 .Traditional folk medicine uses the knowledge, skills and practices based on the theories, beliefs and experiences indigenous to its cultures, for maintenance of health. It holds a heritage of community acceptance, and is solely based on the expertise gained by local herbalists over a period of time 2,3 . It has been estimated that folk healer in India use approximately about 2500 species serve as regular sources of medicine 4 . Plant extracts used in ethnomedical treatment is enjoying great popularly, however, lacks, scientific validation 5,6,3 . Use of traditional medicine has changed dramatically over the due to its affordability, availability, acceptability and accessibility 7 . World Health Organization estimates over 80% of the people in developing countries depend on traditional medicines for their primary health needs 8 . All different organisms, medicinal plants have been greatly considered by rural communities as they improve the economy of rural people 9,10 . India’s traditional system of medicinal is related to richness of herbal plants biodiversity and cultural biodiversity. Indigenous knowledge on natural resources utilization medicinal plants not exceeding the resilience of the surrounding environment is regarded as an important measure of sustainable plants biodiversity conservation 11 .When such indigenous knowledge is being lost, people forced to change their livelihoods often serve environmental degradation 12,13 . An attempt was made to explore the traditional healthcare system of using medicinal plants by the community of Nagapattinam district for the treatment of various of skin problems and ailments. The kodaikkarai forest is the famous in Nagapattinam district. The forest is a home of 154 medicinal plant species like Mucuna pruriens, Solanum trilobatum, Tinospora cordifolia, Randia dumatorum and Cissus quadragularis
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Traditional uses of medicinal plants at Seropédica, Rio de Janeiro

Traditional uses of medicinal plants at Seropédica, Rio de Janeiro

Among the participants, 88% said they use or have already used medicinal plants for the treat- ment of any illness, were mentioned seventy-three different species (Table 1). However, there were few species in common use, the survey totaling five hundred and fifty-three registrations, averaging 2.6 plants/individual user. The sixteen medicinal plants most commonly used, according to the survey, were arnica, aroeira, boldo, chamomile, cana-do-brejo, lemon grass, gorse, fennel, lemon balm, guava, gua- co, pennyroyal, breaks stone, punica, air plant and Birdseed. Six of which (boldo, lemon grass, gorse, lemon balm, breaks stone and air plant) accounted for 50% of all species cited in the research, as illus- trated in Table 2 and Fig. 2.
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MEDICAMENTOS À BASE DE PLANTAS: CONTRIBUTO PARA O APROVEITAMENTO DOS RECURSOS NATURAIS NACIONAIS

MEDICAMENTOS À BASE DE PLANTAS: CONTRIBUTO PARA O APROVEITAMENTO DOS RECURSOS NATURAIS NACIONAIS

In the last decade the European Union has harmonized the use of plants with medicinal and therapeutic purposes, based on different ethnopharmacological traditions. Currently, a considerable amount of monographs demonstrating the efficacy of several plants are already approved at community level, with indications for use either as well established authorization or traditional use registration. Several of these plants grow spontaneously in Portugal, indicating that it is possible their culture and exploitation by companies interested in their use, trade and export, as medicines. In this article the approved indications at Community level for plants that arise spontaneously in Portugal are presented, being also suggested the creation of a platform that brings together authorities, universities and economic actors to promote and facilitate the exploitation of these valuable national natural resources.
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The use of medicinal plants by an indigenous Pataxó community in NE Brazil

The use of medicinal plants by an indigenous Pataxó community in NE Brazil

The Pataxó occupation of the south part of Bahia initiated in 1805. The group was gathered in a village called Barra Velha, at Monte Pacoal (Pascoal Mount), together with many other Indian groups, as the Maxakali, Botocudos, Camakã and Tupiniquim. Monte Pascoal, a peak 586 m high, was the first land sighted when the Portuguese discovered Brazil in 1500. The Park was dedicated in 1961 at which time it covered 22,500 ha; the area was later reduced to 14,000 ha, with most of the excluded territory given to the local Pataxós Indian tribe (Pádua, 1989). The park lies 250 km south of Ilhéus and extends westward from the coast 30 km to Monte Pascoal (16º53'-16º58’S, 39º07'-39º25’W).  The area receives approximately 1500-1750 mm per year of rainfall with 1-2 dry months per year. Annual temperatures average 22-24ºC (IBAMA, 2009). The vegetation of the eastern part of the Park is restinga and mangrove and of the western part, southern Bahian wet forest over laterite. Many small Indian communities leaved Barra Velha after creation of the Park, and occupied other regions around Monte Pascoal; among them are the villages of Corumbauzinho, Águas Belas and Mata Medonha. Mata Medonha village was established in 1951 in a region, so far completed isolated, by a family originally from Barra Velha. Other family groups, also from this original community would come later to occupy this region, making, in 1998, 143 individuals. Mata Medonha stands along the Santo Antonio River and is situated at 12 Km from the city of Santa Cruz Cabrália. The village has 549 ha (FUNAI, 2009) with 255 individuals divided among 25 families. The members of the Mata Medonha village still maintain their knowledge of the medicinal plants although the forest has been significantly reduced and members have been spread around other areas. The aim of this paper is to document the use of medicinal plants by the Pataxó community of Mata Medonha.
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Traditional use of medicinal plants by elderly

Traditional use of medicinal plants by elderly

The limiting factor of this study was the completion at the Consortium of the North of Paraná that provides service to regional health districts of the region, but that has unique characteristics when compared to other states that provide the same service. Thus the results characterize specifically this study population and can not be generalized. This suggests that further studies should be conducted in order to have a broader view on the use of medicinal plants by the elderly, without ceasing to be useful as a guide such future actions.
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USE OF FRESH PARTS OF MEDICINAL PLANTS FOR HEALTH AND PRODUCTION IN LIVESTOCK – A NEW CONCEPT OF FARMING

USE OF FRESH PARTS OF MEDICINAL PLANTS FOR HEALTH AND PRODUCTION IN LIVESTOCK – A NEW CONCEPT OF FARMING

Plants with wound healing effect : Barleria lupulina Lindl., Blumea lacera (Burm.f.) DC., Vigna unguiculata subsp. unguiculata (L.) Walp., Adhatoda vasica Nees, Cynodon dactylon (L.) Pers. .(Annon 1950)., Curcuma longa L., Glinus lotoides L., Eupatorium triplinerve Vahl, (Annon 1952)., Aloe vera (L.) Burm.f. (Biswas et al.2009),, Mikania scandens (L.) Willd., Artemisia nilagirica (C.B.Clarke) Pamp. (Pattanayak et al. 2012), Croton bonplandianum Baill. (Pal and Jain 1998), Dillenia indica L., Diospyros malabarica (Desr.) Kostel., Eclipta prostrata (L.) L., Tagetes patula L., Pandanus foetidus Roxb. (Pattanayak et al. 2012), Achyranthes aspera L. (Chopra and Nayer 1956) Anisomeles indica (Baranwal et al. 2012, Pattanayak et al. 2012), Aristolochia indica L. (Jain 1995), Bambusa bambos (L.) Voss (Pattanayak et al. 2012), Bryophyllum pinnatum (Lam.) Oken (Ambasta 1986), Capparis zeylanica L. (Lather et al. 2010, Pattanayak et al. 2012), Senna sophera (L.) Roxb. (Chopra and Nayer 1956), Coccinia grandis (L.) Voigt (Pattanayak et al. 2012), Heliotropium indicum L. (Annon 1959), Litsea glutinosa (Lour.) C.B. Rob. (Ambasta 1986, Pattanayak et al. 2012), Solanum virginianum L. (Jain 1995). Helianthus annuus L. (Roychowdhury 2008), Garcinia morella (Gaertn.) Desr. (Roychowdhury 2008), Jasminum auriculatum Vahl, (Roychowdhury 2008), Cyanthillium cinereum (L.) H.Rob. (Roychowdhury 2008), Sida cordifolia L., Terminalia chebula Retz.
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Chosen aspects of thermo-mechanical phenomena in resin bonded sands by use of Hot Distortion tests

Chosen aspects of thermo-mechanical phenomena in resin bonded sands by use of Hot Distortion tests

Two thcrmic sources (clcctric and gascous) to sarnplc hcating was testcd and analyscd. I t was intmduced the cxtended measurement and recording of choscn parameters. i.e, va[r]

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Ethnobotanical study of medicinal plants in Imperatriz, State of Maranhão, Northeastern Brazil

Ethnobotanical study of medicinal plants in Imperatriz, State of Maranhão, Northeastern Brazil

The toxicity of C. ambrosioides is due to the main constituent ascaridol present in the essential oil, especially if used in large quantities, with toxic effects to the kidney, liver, intestine (Pereira et al. 2010), producing slight hepatotoxic lesions (Silva et al. 2014), changes in the nervous system such as headache, facial flushing, blurred vision and paresthesia, and also gastroenteritis with diffuse hyperemia and genotoxic effects (Gadano et al. 2006). Then attention is necessary for the doses of leaf and inflorescence extracts. In our study a peculiarity was observed, C. ambrosioides was the species most used by the population, perhaps due to its popularity, its apparent effectiveness, low cost and easy availability (MacDonald et al. 2004).
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Fitoterapia em pediatria: a produção de saberes e práticas na Atenção Básica Fitoterapia en pediatría: la producción de saberes y prácticas en la Atención Básica

Fitoterapia em pediatria: a produção de saberes e práticas na Atenção Básica Fitoterapia en pediatría: la producción de saberes y prácticas en la Atención Básica

In this community there were 692 citations of 54 medicinal plants for use in pediatrics, with emphasis on Fennel (10.98%), Boldo (Peumus boldus) (10.12%), Mint (9.83%), Pineapple (9.39%), Mint in general (8.24%), Citronella (6.65%), Garlic (6.21%), Lemongrass (5.2%), Aroeira tree (3.76%) and Ginger (3.03%). The others were 26.52%, as described in Table 1. The main indications of use were for cough, abdominal pain, colic, as a calming and expectorant, and there is also a description of use for oral hygiene, control of fever, sore throat, ear pain, headache, general pain, such as anti-inflammatory, healing, vermifuge and antidiarrheal. The plants have also been cited for the treatment of sinusitis, urinary tract infection, infections in general, renal lithia- sis, asthma, allergic pruritus, skin diseases and anemia. It should be noted that several species were cited as being of daily use for the prevention of diseases.
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Rev. bras. farmacogn.  vol.24 número2

Rev. bras. farmacogn. vol.24 número2

The informants reported a total of 204 plants used for medicinal purposes. Of these, 148 were identified to the species level, fourteen to genus and three to family (Chart 1). Among the identified species, 45% were exotic and obtained mainly by gathering in home gardens (88%), demonstrating that these spaces contain a small collection of plant species that are often used by the family, and indicating the importance of the home gardens. Plants that are not grown in the home gardens may be gathered from the forest (5.5%), from disturbed habitats (4.5%), or purchased from local shops (2%). Most of the species listed in the survey are herbaceous (65.7%), followed by arboreal (19.0%), shrubs (12.5%) and climbing/epiphytic (4.8%) habits. The predominance of herbs may stem from the ease of cultivating them in home gardens, and also that the most commonly used botanical families (Asteraceae, Lamiaceae and Solanaceae) are herbaceous. Arboreal species are usually found in low numbers in the gardens, mostly because of their great demand for space (Galluzzi et al., 2010). The large number of exotic (45%) and naturalized species (20%) reflects their wide distribution and ease of cultivation. This feature, together with the predominant herbaceous habit and occurrence in home gardens may indicate that the species used are predominantly weeds. Weeds are plants that are successful in disturbed environments, short-lived, fast-growing and, often herbaceous (Stepp, 2004). Widely utilized medicinal plants need to be abundant and accessible; therefore, plants that are near will be preferred. The issue of accessibility may be part of the reason that weeds are significant represented in the medicinal flora of different rural communities (Stepp and Moerman, 2001).
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Determination Of Longevity Of Teeth In Buckets Of Loading Equipment In Coal Mines - A Case Study

Determination Of Longevity Of Teeth In Buckets Of Loading Equipment In Coal Mines - A Case Study

The increasing demand of coal for meeting the requirement of the country paved to exploit the coal by opencast mechanized mining at ever increasing stripping ratio. While shovel has been the most widely used equipment, increasing use of dragline is being made in view of high capacity and lower operating cost of a dragline. The replacement of the teeth in shovel and dragline has been a matter of serious concern for the mine operators due to its associated cost and the idling of these equipment. Every Ground Engaging Tool (GET) manufacturing company claims good life of teeth, but such data relates to ideal condition and generally far from the actual condition of the mine. In actual conditions the life of a tooth is much less than what the manufacturing companies claim. Bucket teeth require replacement under the following two conditions:- i) Breakage of tooth
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DIFFICULTIES OF HEALTH PREFESSIONALS FACING THE USE OF MEDICINAL PLANTS AND FITOTHERAPY

DIFFICULTIES OF HEALTH PREFESSIONALS FACING THE USE OF MEDICINAL PLANTS AND FITOTHERAPY

The participants were 19 health professionals from FHS Caico / RN, ten doctors and nine nurses. The difficulties presented by the research subjects left the enrolled population of UBSF, and respondents' own professional health service in question. With regard to the population, were highlighted rejection culturally attributed to the use of medicinal plants / herbal and know weakened; healthcare professionals, the deficit on PIC approach in an academic setting, the lack of EPS in health services and the difficulty access to scientific studies, and the health service, lack of support for development / expansion of therapies for not providing the inputs provided by PNPIC.
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Rev. Bras. Cienc. Farm.  vol.44 número3

Rev. Bras. Cienc. Farm. vol.44 número3

Plinia edulis (Myrtaceae), popularmente conhecida como “cambucá”, é uma planta medicinal nativa do Brasil e empregada no tratamento de problemas esto- macais e afecções de garganta por populações caiçaras. Buscando contribuir para o conhecimento da espécie, as folhas de P. edulis foram caracterizadas macro e microscopicamente e a composição química do óleo volátil foi determinada usando uma combinação d e C G / E M e í n d i c e s d e re t e n ç ã o . O e x t r a t o hidroetanólico das folhas foi avaliado quanto ao per- fil fitoquímico e à atividade antimicrobiana procuran- do-se a correlação dos metabólitos secundários e o uso tradicional. As folhas apresentam características morfológicas comuns a outras mirtáceas e algumas particularidades, como a presença de 2 a 4 idioblastos, contendo drusas e cristais prismáticos, dispostos per- pendicularmente à face adaxial. No óleo volátil foram identificados 15 componentes, dentre os quais o epi-α- cadinol (21.7%), o α-cadinol (20.2%) e o trans- cariofileno (14.2%) foram os majoritários. A triagem fitoquímica do extrato hidroetanólico evidenciou a pre- sença de substâncias de interesse farmacológico, tais como flavonóides, taninos, saponinas e terpenóides. No entanto, apesar da presença destas classes, o extrato não inibiu o crescimento de Aspergillus niger, Candida albicans, Escherichia coli e Staphylococcus aureus na concentração de até 1.000 mg/mL.
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REPOSITORIO INSTITUCIONAL DA UFOP: Combination of extracts from Aristolochia cymbifera with streptomycin as a potential antibacterial drug.

REPOSITORIO INSTITUCIONAL DA UFOP: Combination of extracts from Aristolochia cymbifera with streptomycin as a potential antibacterial drug.

Species of the Aristolochia genus are used in tra- ditional medicine, mainly in South America, to treat skin diseases, poisoning, wounds, worms, diarrhea, and also as emmenagogues. The species Aristolochia cymbifera (Aristolochiaceae) is popularly known as jarrinha, papo de peru, cipó mil homens, cassaú and other common names (Wu et al. 2004). Some studies using A. cymbifera extracts have indicated potential antimicrobial properties of this species. In experiments performed by Carvalho et al. (2008), the leaf methanol extract of this species showed strong activity against promastigotes from Leishmania chagasi, and the di- terpene copalic acid was isolated using bioassay-guided fractionation and showed high toxicity against the extracellular form of the parasite. Sartorelli et al. (2010) observed that copalic acid was also active against trypomastigotes of Trypanosoma cruzi. Copalic acid maintained its selectivity against T. cruzi, al- though it showed low toxicity against infected mam- malian cells.
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