Top PDF New Coleoptera records from New Brunswick, Canada: Lycidae

New Coleoptera records from New Brunswick, Canada: Lycidae

New Coleoptera records from New Brunswick, Canada: Lycidae

We thank Caroline Simpson for editing this manuscript. Yves Bousquet and two anon- ymous reviewers made many helpful suggestions that greatly improved this manuscript. C. Majka and J. Cook are thanked for determining some Lycidae specimens of the irst author. Nichole Brawn, Katie Burgess, Marie-Andrée Giguère, Nancy Harn, Cory Hughes, Ervin Kovacs, Colin MacKay, Wayne MacKay, Jessica Price, Michelle Roy, and Vincent Webster are thanked for technical assistance and collecting specimens. We thank Natural Resources Canada, Canadian Forest Service; the Canadian Food Inspec- tion Agency; and USDA APHIS for funding the study on early detection of invasive cerambycids, which provided specimens from Lindgren funnel traps. he Canadian Wildlife Service is thanked for funding insect surveys at the Portobello Creek National Wildlife Area; the New Brunswick Environmental Trust Fund and New Brunswick Wildlife Trust Fund for funding various insect surveys over the past 7 years; and the Meduxnekeag River Association for permission to sample beetles at the Meduxnekeag Valley Nature Preserve (which includes the Bell Forest). he New Brunswick Depart- ment of Natural Resources (Fish and Wildlife Branch) is thanked for issuing permits for sampling in the Protected Natural Areas and logistical support. Survey work in the Caledonia Gorge Protected Natural Area was organized through the New Brunswick Museum with external funding from the New Brunswick Environmental Trust Fund, Salamander Foundation, and the New Brunswick Wildlife Trust Fund.
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New Coleoptera records from New Brunswick, Canada: Trogossitidae, Cleridae, and Melyridae, with an addition to the fauna of Nova Scotia

New Coleoptera records from New Brunswick, Canada: Trogossitidae, Cleridae, and Melyridae, with an addition to the fauna of Nova Scotia

Most specimens reported in this paper were collected from Lindgren 12-funnel trap sam- ples during a study to develop a general attractant for the detection of invasive species of Cerambycidae. hese traps may visually mimic tree trunks and are often efective for sampling species of Coleoptera that live in microhabitats associated with standing trees (Lindgren 1983). See Webster et al. (in press) for details of the methods used to deploy Lindgren funnel traps and for sample collection. A description of the habitat was recorded for all specimens collected during this survey. Locality and habitat data are presented ex- actly as on labels for each record. his information, as well as additional collecting notes, is summarized and discussed in collection and habitat data section for each species.
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New Coleoptera records from New Brunswick, Canada: Gyrinidae, Carabidae, and Dytiscidae

New Coleoptera records from New Brunswick, Canada: Gyrinidae, Carabidae, and Dytiscidae

and Larivière (2003) summarized the known natural history and biology of the North American species of this family. Most recently, Bousquet (2010) provided an illustrated key to the adults and larvae of the ground beetles of northeastern North America. hese works should be consulted for details on the taxonomy, natural history, and biology of members of this family. Many Carabidae are predators on arthropods or scavengers of dead or dying arthropods; others are predators on seeds (Ball and Bous- quet 2001; Larochelle and Larivière 2003). Carabids are usually ground dwellers, as their common name implies, although some species are arboreal and live under bark, on trunks or branches, or are associated with vegetation. Many species are hygrophil- ous or periaquatic, occupying marshes, swamps forests, riparian zones, and other damp habitats. Other species are xerophiles and live in dry forests, grasslands, and sandy habitats (Ball and Bousquet 2001; Larochelle and Larivière 2003). Webster and Bous- quet (2008) provided an overview of the Carabidae of New Brunswick and reported 50 species new to the province, bringing the total number of species known from the province to 328. Recent survey work by the irst author has resulted in the discovery of four additional species from New Brunswick, all of which are new to the Maritime provinces. See Webster and Bousquet (2008) and Bousquet (2010) for a list of the other species known from New Brunswick.
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Adventive Staphylinidae (Coleoptera) of the Maritime Provinces of Canada: further contributions

Adventive Staphylinidae (Coleoptera) of the Maritime Provinces of Canada: further contributions

(Gravenhorst) are newly recorded in the Maritime Provinces. Meotica exilis, newly re- corded in Canada, represents the fi rst verifi able report of this species in North America. Records are provided that establish the presence of L. fulvipenne in North America in fi ve Canadian provinces. Observations on A. insecatus in the fi eld establish that they are predators of dipteran larvae. Atheta dadopora h omson is newly recorded in Prince Edward Island. New records of both Leptacinus intermedius Donisthorpe and Neobisnius villosulus (Stephens) are provided that establish the presence of these species in New Brunswick. New early dates of detection are reported for Quedius curtipennis Bernhauer, Tasgius ater (Gravenhorst), Philonthus cognatus Stephens, and Philonthus rectangulus Sharp. Cilea silphoides (Linnaeus) and Philonthus jurgans Tottenham, previ- ously reported from the region, are added to the fauna of adventive species, whereas Staphylinus ornaticauda LeConte and Creophilus maxillosus (Linnaeus), native staphyli- nids previously listed as adventive in Majka and Klimaszewski (2008), and Gnypeta caerulea (C.R. Sahlberg), now considered a Holarctic species, are removed from the regional fauna of adventive species. As a consequence, 87 species of adventive Sta- phylinidae are now known to occur in the Maritime Provinces, 76 of which have been recorded in Nova Scotia, 61 in New Brunswick, and 29 on Prince Edward Island (Ap- pendix 1). Specifi c details follow.
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New species and distributional records of Aleocharinae (Coleoptera, Staphylinidae) from Ontario, Canada, with a checklist of recorded species

New species and distributional records of Aleocharinae (Coleoptera, Staphylinidae) from Ontario, Canada, with a checklist of recorded species

Funding for the Ontario Arthropod Surveys (2010, 20111) was provided by the Na- ture Conservancy of Canada (NCC) and the Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources (OMNR). JK thanks Natural Resources Canada for their support of this project. he samples from Ontario soybean ields were collected over the course of the Masters thesis of AJB and supported by funding from the Grain Farmers of Ontario, an OMA- FRA-University of Guelph Sustainable Production Systems research grant awarded to Rebecca Hallett (University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario, Canada) and an NSERC PGS-M and rare charitable research scholarship awarded to AJB. We thank the follow- ing for assistance with and permission to conduct sampling on their properties: NCC, OMNR, Ontario Parks, rare charitable research reserve, University of Guelph Arbore- tum, and A.K. Dewdney (Newport Forest, Wardsville, Ontario, Canada). We thank everyone who provided ield assistance for the survey projects especially: Cody Ander- son, Lauren DesMarteaux, David Makynen, Adam Jewiss-Gaines and Robert Pivar. We are grateful to the following people who provided access to specimens under their care: A. Davies (CNC), A. Newton and M. hayer (FMNH), M. Sörensson (MZLU), D. Furth and F. Shockley (NMNH), R. Webster (cRW) and J. Frisch (ZMB). We thank one anonymous reviewer and A. Davies for corrections and correspondence that greatly improved the manuscript. Additionally, A. Davies graciously provided published and unpublished distribution data from his database. We are grateful to M. hayer for producing the habitus image of Stethusa klimschi. V. Gusarov (University of Oslo, Norway) kindly provided information regarding the online North American record of Callicerus obscurus and other helpful correspondence.
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Contributions towards an understanding of the Cryptophaginae (Coleoptera, Cryptophagidae) of Atlantic Canada

Contributions towards an understanding of the Cryptophaginae (Coleoptera, Cryptophagidae) of Atlantic Canada

Although collecting ef ort for this group in the region is still far from adequate, some preliminary observations can be made. Cryptophagus dii cilis and C. setulosus are abundant species in insular Newfoundland and Labrador (particularly in the lat- ter region), and are completely absent from the Maritime Provinces of Canada (the provinces of New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, and Prince Edward Island). In general, species of Cryptophagus are rather seldom collected in the Maritimes, yet the above two species are abundant and frequently collected in Newfoundland and Labrador; apparently rel ective of dif erences between the forest micro-habitats of the Atlantic Maritime Ecozone on the one hand, and the Boreal Shield and Taiga Shield Ecozones characteristic of Newfoundland and Labrador on the other. Cryptophagus histricus has also been recorded in Labrador, although this study did not i nd further specimens. Conversely native species such as Antherophagus convexulus, Cryptophagus jakowlewi, and Henotiderus centromaculatus, which have been recorded from a number of locali- ties in Nova Scotia (and Prince Edward Island in the case of C. jakowlewi), have not been found in Newfoundland and Labrador.
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The Mycetophagidae (Coleoptera) of the Maritime Provinces of Canada

The Mycetophagidae (Coleoptera) of the Maritime Provinces of Canada

many records from the southern mainland of Nova Scotia, Cape Breton Island, and Prince Edward Island (Fig. 1). Records from New Brunswick and the northern main- land of Nova Scotia are lacking, but it is probable that it is found throughout the region. In the Maritime Provinces L. tetraspilotus has been collected in many habitats including coniferous, deciduous, and mixed forests, seashores, coastal barrens, grass- lands, marshy areas, a sandy pine barren, and an old i eld ecosystem. Specimens have been collected on the foliage of white pine (Pinus strobus L.), jack pine (Pinus sylvestris L.), red spruce (Picea rubens Sarg.), balsam i r (Abies balsamea (L.) Mill.), on decidu- ous, and herbaceous vegetation, on bristly sarsaparilla (Aralia hispida Vent.), and in a rotting mushroom. Klimaszewski and Majka (2007) reported L. tetraspilotus as an in- quline inhabitant of oak apple galls on red oak (Quercus rubra L.) induced by Andricus (Callirhytis) sp. (Cynipidae) wasps. Rauf et al. (1985) found it on jack pine, Tucker (1919) found it on American mistletoe (Phoradendron l avescens (Pursh) Nutt., and Ulyschen and Hanula (2010) reared it from decomposing loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) logs in South Carolina.
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New records of Cerambycidae (Coleoptera) for New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, and Prince Edward Island, Canada

New records of Cerambycidae (Coleoptera) for New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, and Prince Edward Island, Canada

S. vestita, and T. praeusta) newly recorded for the Maritime Provinces were associated with the Grand Lake Lowlands and adjacent Saint John River Valley Hardwood Forest. h e Grand Lake Lowlands (Hinds 2000) (near Grand Lake and the middle ar- eas of the Saint John River valley of New Brunswick) is characterized by seasonally l ooded marshes, alluvial l oodplain forests dominated by silver maple (Acer sacchari- num L., Aceraceae), with butternut (Juglans cinerea L., Juglandaceae), bur oak (Quercus macrocarpa Michx., Fagaceae), and basswood (Tilia americana L., Tiliaceae) on higher ground, and the warmest climate in New Brunswick (Hinds 2000). Red oak (Quercus rubra L., Fagaceae) stands occur on some of the higher sandy ridges in this area. Silver maple forests which are absent from Nova Scotia, are more characteristic of l oodplain forests of the lower Saint Lawrence River valley and more southern areas of New Eng- land. Some of the plants recorded from this ecozone are at the northeastern limits of their ranges, and in a few cases are disjunct from more southern populations in south- ern Nova Scotia, central Maine, or the lower Saint Lawrence River valley of Quebec (Hinds 2000). Twelve species of Carabidae have been recorded solely from this ecore- gion in New Brunswick and the Maritime provinces (Webster and Bousquet 2008). It is therefore not surprising that Callimoxys s. sanguinicollis, Purpuricenus humeralis, Astylopsis collaris, and Sternidius misellus, species more characteristic of southern On- tario and southern Quebec, were found in this region of New Brunswick. One spe- cies, Brachyleptura circumdata, was newly recorded for Canada from the Grand Lake Lowlands ecozone.
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New Staphylinidae (Coleoptera) records with new collection data from New Brunswick, Canada. I. Aleocharinae

New Staphylinidae (Coleoptera) records with new collection data from New Brunswick, Canada. I. Aleocharinae

We thank Ian DeMerchant (AFC) for creating the distribution maps, Pamela Cheers (LFC) for editing this manuscript and D. Paquet (LFC) for formatting it. Jon Sweeney (AFC) revised the fi rst draft of this manuscript and provided very useful comments. We thank Anthony Davies (Canadian National Collection of Insects) for supplying records. Th e fi rst author thanks Marie-Andrée Giguère, Scott Makepeace, Kate Bredin and Jim Edsall for assistance in collecting specimens, and Dwayne Sabine for assistance in locating collecting sites. He thanks the Canadian Wildlife Service for funding insect surveys at the Shepody and Portobello Creek National Wildlife Areas, the New Bruns- wick Environmental Trust Fund and New Brunswick Wildlife Trust Fund for funding various insect surveys over the past fi ve years, and the Meduxnekeag River Association for permission to sample beetles at the Meduxnekeag Valley Nature Preserve.
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Contributions to the knowledge of the Aleocharinae (Coleoptera, Staphylinidae) in the Maritime Provinces of Canada

Contributions to the knowledge of the Aleocharinae (Coleoptera, Staphylinidae) in the Maritime Provinces of Canada

Since 1970, 203 species of Aleocharinae have been recorded in the Maritime Provinces of Canada, 174 of which have been reported in the past decade. h is rapid growth of knowledge of this hitherto neglected subfamily of rove beetles occasions the present compilation of species recorded in the region together with the chronology of their discovery. Sixteen new provincial records are reported, twelve from Nova Scotia, one from New Brunswick, and three from Prince Edward Island. Seven species, including Oxypoda chantali Klimaszewski, Oxypoda perexilis Casey, Myllaena cuneata Notman, Placusa canadensis Klimasze- wski, Geostiba (Sibiota) appalachigena Gusarov, Lypoglossa angularis obtusa (LeConte), and Trichiusa postica Casey [tentative identii cation] are newly recorded in the Maritime Provinces, one of which, Myllaena cuneata, is newly recorded in Canada. A preliminary analysis of the composition of the fauna indicates that the percentage of adventive species (18.2%) is consistent with that of other groups of Coleoptera. Both Cape Breton Island and Prince Edward Island are comparatively faunistically under-represented, in all probability as a result of insui cient collecting ef ort in these areas. A species accumulation curve indicates that it is probable that further species of aleocharines remain to be documented in the region.
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Five new records of coastal fishes from São Tomé Island

Five new records of coastal fishes from São Tomé Island

The underwater photographer Manuel Silva photographed Rhynchobatus lübberti at a dive site called Pedra do Vitorino (figure 1). This photo is the first record of the species for São Tomé Island. Rhynchobatus lübberti has previously been recorded from Senegal to Congo (STEHMANN 1990).

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Seven new records of fish from NGor Island, Senegal

Seven new records of fish from NGor Island, Senegal

ing some of the dives, Chromis cadenati Whitley, 1951 was also observed in small groups of up to 20 animals and in depths deeper than 20 m. Dur- ing one dive, at 25 m depth, a single Chromis was observed and photographed (Fig. 1) but not iden- tified at that moment. At first glance it appeared similar to Chromis lubbocki Edwards 1986, a species so far recorded only from the Cape Verde Islands (Edwards 1986), because of a blue margin to the anal fin. However, this blue margin is a thin line at the anterior edge of the anal fin in lubbocki (compare with Figure 1 below, showing animals from the Cape Verde Islands), whereas it is a much broader area and more to the rear of the anal fin in the photographed animal. There is no resemblance to the only other West African Chromis, i.e. Chromis multilineata (Guichenot, 1853), that is known from the Cape Verde Islands to São Tomé and Príncipe (but not from the coast of Senegal – see Discussion below). The animal photographed at NGor might belong to an unde- scribed species or (more likely as it was the only individual observed) might be a hybrid between Chromis limbata and a stray C. lubbocki. In the latter case it is likely to be the result of a female C. lubbocki mating with a male C. limbata (cf. Wirtz 1999).
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New species and new records of terrestrial isopods (Crustacea, Isopoda, Oniscidea) from Brazil

New species and new records of terrestrial isopods (Crustacea, Isopoda, Oniscidea) from Brazil

Remarks. To date, Androdeloscia includes 25 Neotropical species recorded from Bolivia, Brazil (Amazonian region), Colombia, Guatemala, Mexico, Peru and Venezuela (Schmalfuss, 2003; Schmidt & Leistikow, 2005; Grangeiro & Souza, 2006; Grangeiro & Christoffersen, 2010; López-Orosco et al., 2016). The genus is mainly defined by the reduced body length, antennula with many aesthetascs inserted in one lateral set plus apical pair, antennal flagellum of three articles with apical organ as long as distal article of flagellum, noduli laterales with d/c coordinates showing a peak on pereonite 4, male pleopod 1 exopod rounded and endopod stout bearing a complex distal structure, male pleopod 2 endopod extremely elongated, and male pleopod 5 exopod grooved on medial margin with pectinate scales to accommodate pleopod 2 endopod (Leistikow, 1999, 2001; Schmidt & Leistikow, 2005).
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Alona isabellae Sousa, Elmoor-Loureiro and

Alona isabellae Sousa, Elmoor-Loureiro and

Material examined. 2 adult females, UARC327M. Remarks. Macrothrix spinosa was the least abundant species among Macrothricidae in the samples and was originally described from Australia by King (1853). It is similar to its Neotropical congener M. squamosa; therefore, the latter species was accepted as a synonym of M. spinosa. This synonymy is based on the similarity of general characteristics, for example the general aspect of the valve, antennule, and postabdomen (Elmoor- Loureiro, 2007). Taking into consideration the concept of non-cosmopolitanism in cladocerans given by Frey (1982), it is possible that M. spinosa and M. squamosa constitute separate species; nevertheless, an exhaustive revision is required.
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Pseudoexeirarthra, a new genus from New Zealand (Coleoptera, Staphylinidae, Pselaphinae), with descriptions of seven new species

Pseudoexeirarthra, a new genus from New Zealand (Coleoptera, Staphylinidae, Pselaphinae), with descriptions of seven new species

Sagola Sharp, 1874, the largest genus of the supertribe Faronitae, has been considered to be a paraphyletic assemblage of species (Chandler 2001). Sagola was recently revised by Park and Carlton (2014) as well as other extant genera, Exeirarthra (Park and Carl- ton 2011) and Stenosagola (Park and Carlton 2013). hree species, S. spinifer Broun, S. puncticollis Broun, and S. colorata Broun are distinctive morphologically and can be easily separated from the other Sagola species by the absence of anterior and posterior frontal foveae, absence of promesocoxal foveae, presence of an inverted triangle-shaped process along the anterior margins of abdominal tergites IV–VI, and female sternite VIII bearing a pseudosternite. Based on these characters, a new genus, Pseudoexeirar- thra gen. n. is established to accommodate the three previously described species and seven new species.
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New species of Stenocrates from Brazil (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae)

New species of Stenocrates from Brazil (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae)

zoidal , narrowing apically, sides almost straight, apex truncate and slightly emarginate , margins reflexed; surface feebly and sparsely aciculate, irregularly punctate; p[r]

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New records of Tindariopsis (Pelecypoda, Protobranchia) from Brazil - Campos Basin (off Rio de Janeiro)

New records of Tindariopsis (Pelecypoda, Protobranchia) from Brazil - Campos Basin (off Rio de Janeiro)

Abstract: As a part of the Environmental Characterization of the Campos Basin project, we obtained samples from the continental slope benthos. As a consequence, specimens of Tindariopsis aeolata (Dall, 1889) and Tindariopsis agathida (Dall, 1889) were found. These species show prodissoconch surface sculpture patterns that were never seen for species of Tindariopsis. The presence of this kind of sculpture in the type species of the genus, T. agathida, adds diagnostic characters to the genus. T. agathida and T. aeolata are typical from the Caribbean Realm (Guyana and Tobago). This is the first record of T. aeolata in the southernmost area of the Atlantic Ocean, and also the shallowest record (1000 m) for this species. With this finding of specimens from the Bacia de Campos, the distribution of T. agathida can now be extended in the Brazilian coast from 7° to 22° S. Keywords: deep-Sea, Bathyspinulidae, southeast Brazil, geographical distribution.
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Effects of forest harvesting on summer stream temperatures in New Brunswick, Canada: an inter-catchment, multiple-year comparison

Effects of forest harvesting on summer stream temperatures in New Brunswick, Canada: an inter-catchment, multiple-year comparison

1971; van Groenwoud, 1980; Plamondon et al., 1982; Martin et al., 1985; Beschta and Taylor, 1988; Stott and Marks, 2000). A common stream-temperature management practice involves leaving strips of forest on both sides of streams in order to provide shade protection from direct insolation. In New Brunswick (NB), for example, provincial forestry regulations require that 30-m buffer strips on both sides of the stream be used on all mapped, non-intermittent streams >0.5 m wide to protect them from excessive radiative warming (Stewart and Comeau, 1996). Low- ordered streams, ephemeral channels <0.5 m wide and seepage points in upper catchments are ordinarily not buffered because they are usually ill-defined and difficult to detect. Their dense network would furthermore encumber all wood extraction in upper catchments by clear cutting and other low-retention cutting methods.
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New host, geographic records, and histopathologic studies of Angiostrongylus spp (Nematoda: Angiostrongylidae) in rodents from Argentina with updated summary of records from rodent hosts and host specificity assessment

New host, geographic records, and histopathologic studies of Angiostrongylus spp (Nematoda: Angiostrongylidae) in rodents from Argentina with updated summary of records from rodent hosts and host specificity assessment

The main definitive hosts of angiostrongylid nema- todes of the superfamily Metastrongylidoidea are carni- vores and rodents and the known intermediate hosts are molluscs (e.g., Acha & Szyfres 2003). To date, 21 species of the genus Angiostrongylus Kamensky 1905 have been reported around the world. Six species have been de- scribed infecting carnivores: Angiostrongylus vasorum Baillet 1866, Angiostrongylus raillieti Travassos 1927, Angiostrongylus gubernaculatus Dougherty 1946, An- giostrongylus chabaudi Biocca 1957, Angiostrongylus daskalovi Yanchev & Genov 1988, and Angiostrongy- lus felineus Vieira et al. 2013, and the remainder from rodents: Angiostrongylus tateronae Baylis 1928, Angi- ostrongylus cantonensis (Chen 1935), Angiostrongylus sciuri Merdevenci 1964, Angiostrongylus mackerrasae Bhaibulaya 1968, Angiostrongylus sandarsae Alicata 1968, Angiostrongylus petrovi Tarzhimanova & Chert- kova 1969, Angiostrongylus dujardini Drozdz & Doby 1970, Angiostrongylus schmidti Kinsella 1971, Angi- ostrongylus costaricensis Morera & Céspedes 1971, Angiostrongylus malaysiensis Bhaibulay & Cross 1971,
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