Top PDF Palavras em desdobramento na poesia de Herberto Helder

Anthropology and/as education, de Tim Ingold

Anthropology and/as education, de Tim Ingold

Para dimensionar la cualidad generativa del conocimiento, Ingold nos ofrece como ejemplo los libros de recetas. Sus instrucciones no codifican deta- lladamente un conocimiento preexistente como si fueran lineamientos rígidos para copiar, sino que son medios que “abren un camino al conocimiento” (12), puesto que mientras se recorre un paisaje de tareas (taskscape), las instrucciones operan como indicaciones generales a partir de las cuales el practicante —con base en su sensibilidad cultivada por experiencias previas— aprende a identifi- car el camino a seguir. En esta medida, “este no es un conocimiento que ha sido transmitido a mí; es conocimiento que ha crecido en mí mientras he seguido los mismos caminos que mis predecesores y bajo su dirección” (12). Ingold agrega que, al igual que con las historias, su significancia no está incrustada en la na- rrativa, sino que los oyentes deben “encontrarla por sí mismos, trayéndola en correspondencia con su propia experiencia e historia de vida” (12).
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The art of inquiry: overcoming the fixation on the new materialisms [Reseña de libro]

The art of inquiry: overcoming the fixation on the new materialisms [Reseña de libro]

Over the past years, particularly in his books Being Alive (2011) and Making (2013), Tim Ingold has engaged in a sustained critique of the concept of agency and its wide currency in academic accounts of materiality, in the wake of the works of Bruno Latour—concerning human and non-human agency within hybrid networks comprising entities like computers, bacteria and plants—and of Alfred Gell, with reference to agency in relations between persons and material objects. Ingold’s main contention is that the entire question of agency lies on a false premise: that matter is inert and can only be re- animated by adding to it a “sprinkling” of agency. But if we remove from matter the dead hand of “materiality,” and, instead, conceive matter as things—that is, particular interweavings of materials in movement, including humans and nonhumans—then an extraneous “agency” becomes unnecessary, as things reveal themselves to us “not as quiescent objects but as hives of activity, pulsing with the flows of materials that keep them alive.” The way to go is thus to restore things to the generative fluxes of the world of materials in which they came into being and continue to subsist—“things are in life rather than life in things” ( Being Alive 29). Against the grain of standard accounts of materiality, things do not possess agency but are rather possessed by action . What we need therefore, Ingold argues, is “a theory not of agency but of life,” because “the generativity of action is that of animate life itself, and lies in the vitality of its materials” ( Making 97).
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Between outer space and human space: knowing space as the origin of anthropology

Between outer space and human space: knowing space as the origin of anthropology

Let us begin at the end, with a photograph of our planet Earth in Figure 1. Often called “Earth Rising”, this image was taken on 24 December 1968, by the crew of the Apollo 8 mission, and it, along with other photos taken during that mission, is of staggering historical significance, because it documents the first moment in five thousand years of recorded history that any human being physically saw the entire earth. It has often been credited with giving impetus to the then-nascent environmentalist movement, which, if true, would make it an ancestor of much of our contemporary political rhetoric. 1 However, what interests me about this photograph is that every educated person in the modern world is capable of interpreting it. Those of us raised within the Western-inspired system of scientific education were exposed at young ages to geometry, geography, earth science, physics and so forth and can, thus, immediately recognize the blue thing in the background as our home planet. Moreover, we are able to do so in the context of another heavenly body that sits in the foreground, and which no more than a dozen human beings have ever visited. That is to say, in order to understand this photograph, modern viewers must orient themselves within the picture by projecting their perspective into a place that they have never been, while looking back upon a place they have never actually seen. How did it come to this point? And what does the ability to project space mean for the history of Western thought?
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The dynamic interface of bioarchaeology and forensic anthropology

The dynamic interface of bioarchaeology and forensic anthropology

Since the thrust of this piece is the dynamic and mutually beneficial nature of the overlapping methodologies, Ubelaker spends little time on the distinctions in the fields. For example, in his discussion on the flow of knowledge from forensic anthropology to bioarcheology the analysis suffers from oversimplification that obscures the utility of forensic methods in bioarchaeological contexts. Research in forensic anthropology on establishing the biological profile is mentioned as an area that has impacted bioarcheology. While there are certainly examples of this (e.g., Hens et al. 2000; Raxter et al. 2006; Giannecchini and Moggi-Cecchi 2008), methods generated to analyze components of the biological profile are often population specific (e.g., stature equations) and are not appropriate for use in a bioarchaeological context (Genoves 1967; Bidmos 2008; Ross and Kimmerle 2010; Sutphin and Ross 2011). Also important to note is the lack of discussion on the systematic process of standardization that has been occurring in forensic anthropology over the past seven years. Since the publication of the 2009 NAS report, Strengthening Forensic Science in the United States, a Path Forward, forensic anthropology has focused on standardization at every level from education to casework (Committee on Identifying the Needs of the Forensic Science Community National Research Council of the National Academy of Sciences 2009; Scientific Working Group for Forensic Anthropology 2012; Bunch and Stoppacher 2015). To this end, the scientific working group for forensic anthropology (SWGANTH) initiated in 2008, has developed several documents on best practices in the discipline (Scientific Working Group for Anthropology 2012). What is critical here is that the process of standardization that is currently a central component of the metamorphosis of forensic anthropology, is the process of distinction. Essentially, for the past seven years, many hours of work have been dedicated to determining who should practice forensic anthropology and under what title, what methods should be used, how case reports should be written, and what type of training is acceptable. We are now well past the planning phase and into the implementation phase. In
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Adam Smith: Anthropology and Moral Philosophy

Adam Smith: Anthropology and Moral Philosophy

According to Smith, the interests of those who live within the limits imposed by the reach of their salary are congruent with the interests of society; normally, however, such people lack the education and knowledge necessary to discern these parallel interests. They contri- bute to the wealth of the nation by their work, but they remain una- ware of the significance of their contribution. In contrast, the social class that lives off the profits generated by work is detached from general social needs. They seek to expand markets and sharpen com- petition in order to maximize the profits they may make. In spite of these cross purposes, society as a whole may still benefit and pro- gress as a result of this situation: through the untrammelled ambi- tion of a few (the rich), the vast majority may enjoy the social move- ment of wealth in the form of merchandise, as such products beco- me available even to those who belong to the lowest classes on the social scale.
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Alienation. A Challenge for Citizenship Education

Alienation. A Challenge for Citizenship Education

Alienation is not an easy phenomenon to describe. No doubt it signifies not feeling comfortable, but it is by no means clear what kind of discomfort it is, to whom it pertains and what causes it. Adding to the complexity is the origin of the words used to demarcate the subject matter. What we are presently discussing under the heading ‘alienation’ has it primary roots in a more than 200 years old discussion in German of the heading of ‘Entfremdung’. The word ‘Entfremdung’ was chosen by Goethe to translate the French ‘alienation’ used by Denis Diderot in the novel Rameau’s Nephew, and the latter is explicitly quoted by Hegel in the reflection on alienation in the said Phenomenology. 13 However, whereas ‘alienation’ in English almost exclusively signifies disposing of, or being deprived of, something unspecific, in French it can also mean being deprived of something very specific, namely being deprived of reason, i.e. being foolish, out of one’s mind, or outright in sane. This is the scope that we are dealing with in the present analysis.
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Challenges in european Higher Education

Challenges in european Higher Education

Globalization, individualization, digitalization and information boom were fundamental world-wide changes that occurred during the 1990s, following the rise of international markets, communication and information technology in the 1980s. The economic and financial crisis of the 2010s has not only deepened and hastened these changes, but also set new challenges to the world in terms of restructuring the knowledge-based society through creativity and innovation, next to formulating new responses to the issues of climate and immigration, as well as to the widening gap between rich and poor. Higher education has to be deeply involved in this new phase, both through education and training (new competences for new jobs within the framework of lifelong learning), and through applied research (new knowledge to be implemented through innovation). Today, the world needs more and better educated graduates. Higher education institutions need to reformulate their missions and strategies.
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Fotoetnografía : emergencia, uso silencioso y tres irrupciones en la tradición estadounidense

Fotoetnografía : emergencia, uso silencioso y tres irrupciones en la tradición estadounidense

Gravitando alrededor de los mismos principios de Arago, Hol- mes encabeza su texto “The Stereoscope and the Stereograph” con la idea de que con la fotografía “la forma se divorcia de la materia. De hecho, la materia como objeto visible no es más de gran uso, salvo por el molde con el que la forma se constituye. Denos unos pocos negativos de una cosa que valga la pena, tomados desde distintos puntos de vista, y esto es todo lo que queremos de ella. Luego tírela o quémela si le pla- ce.” (1858, pág. 738) Si bien el planteamiento de Holmes es extremo, se inserta enla corriente de pensamiento de mayor influencia en la ciencia del siglo XIX y de la primera mitad del XX, pero cuyo alcance se puede rastrear hasta hoy: el positivismo. Empata con el sentimiento positivis- ta de que, a fin de cuentas, los datos son más importantes que el mundo al que se refieren, ya que estos nos permiten la reflexión sistemática que nos conduce al conocimiento de la Verdad, la que trasciende a los distintos estados de la materia. Respecto a la relación de esta idea con la instalación consensuada de que la fotografía es un lenguaje univer- sal, está en que la fotografía representa (o más bien presenta) las cosas de manera universalmente entendible, lo que supera el alcance de los lenguajes hablados que representan las cosas solo con alcance local. Para quienes tenían una fe religiosa en que la humanidad estaba mon- tada sobre una línea de progreso que nos conducía a una única cultura universal, el bajo grado de abstracción (Collier & Collier, 1986, pág. 7) que presentaba la fotografía realista y que convocaba a la sorpresa de miembros de las más distintas culturas parecía ser una luz que provenía del final del túnel.
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The 'good step' and dwelling in Tim Robinson’s "Stones of Aran": the advent of 'psycho archipelagraphy'

The 'good step' and dwelling in Tim Robinson’s "Stones of Aran": the advent of 'psycho archipelagraphy'

There is a certainly a precedent for considering the common ground between rural and urban walking practices. Robert Macfarlane applies this notion to Robinson himself when he comments in his Introduction to Pilgrimage: “Long before psycho- geography became a modish term, Robinson was out on the dérive […]” (x). He develops this idea of a rural drift further in The Old Ways with his description of the ornithologist W.H. Hudson’s walks, guided by “the charm of the unknown,” as “pastoral psychogeography” (20). This connection between psychogeographic walking and the rural is also made by Stephen E. Hunt in his 2009 essay, “The Emergence of Psychoecology”. Discussing Robert Macfarlane, Roger Deakin, Richard Mabey and Mark Cocker, Hunt states: “Such green flânerie speaks of the emergence of a psychoecology, with richly attuned meanderings that have strategic affinities with the work of psychogeographers, such as lain Sinclair and Will Self who in recent years have negotiated more urban terrain” (71). Hunt also sees his quartet of rural writers as spurred on by a passionate and purposeful concern about the state of the planet. He argues: “they contribute to a generation of new nature writing that is made piquant by its urgency, not so much a passive and regretful nostalgia as an urgent clawing for psychic survival” (77). Notwithstanding this comparison with urban writers and sense of psychoecological urgency, however, Hunt’s reading of the works still carries hints of the Romantic legacy in his interest in the “psychological benefits of engagement with the natural environment” (73) and focus on the achievement of “joy in the natural environment” (77).
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Spatial Data Infrastructures as an Education Resource in Secondary Education in Spain and Argentina

Spatial Data Infrastructures as an Education Resource in Secondary Education in Spain and Argentina

problems require the use of tools as a part of the ICT, among them the SDI’s constitute an alternative worth consideration and exploitation. For instance, by using the map server of the Spatial Data Infrastructure of Spain (IDEE), the layers of protected sites may be added (natural parks, natural reserves, protected landscapes, etc.) Thus the student will use a dynamic tool providing up-to-date information, he/she will search for information by defining the layers he/she will add (select), and he/she will process the information that will be presented in different ways.
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Sir Tim Berners-Lee

Sir Tim Berners-Lee

Además está personalmente involucrado en el desarrollo de su segunda gran idea: la Web semántica, que añade etiquetas identificativas a la información de las páginas Web y crea uniones e[r]

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Identifying stakeholders in a Portuguese university:a case study

Identifying stakeholders in a Portuguese university:a case study

The stakeholder theory proved highly useful to some specific organisations with dispersed powers, such as is the case of universities. This theory may serve to explain the focus on varying communities in the environments surrounding these organisations as well as the relationships between organisations and communities. However, identifying and prioritising the different stakeholders to a university has not proven an easy question to resolve. Given the effective management of university stakeholders necessarily requires the correct identification of just who they are, this article seeks to identify, classify and rank the stakeholders of a university based upon a case study. To this end, we reviewed previous studies sharing similar objectives. After finding that university stakeholders have rarely been identified by empirical means, we carried out a case study on a Portuguese state university that sought to identify and qualify the importance of the respective stakeholder through such means. A series of interviews were held with fifteen individuals, connected with the institution, three from each hierarchical university level. Following content analysis of these interviews, a list containing 21 stakeholders was resulted, duly classified by importance. The final results found students, the teaching and/or research staff and employers identified as the main
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The History of Education as a Discipline and a Field of Research: Old and New Issues

The History of Education as a Discipline and a Field of Research: Old and New Issues

La posición de Tröhler en el capítulo a su cargo en el citado libro – «Truffel pigs, research questions, and histories of education» – me parece más adecuadamente centrada en los problemas actuales de la historia de la educación como disciplina y campo de investigación. Responde mejor a las cuestiones que planteo en este trabajo. En síntesis, ofrece una salida – entre varias posibles – al hecho, constatado en otro escrito, de que «los historiadores de la educación que trabajan en facultades de educación o formación de profesores, particularmente en USA y Canadá» – una consideración que puede extenderse a la gran mayoría de países en los que, a diferencia de Francia, esta materia se imparte e investiga en dichas instituciones – «están encontrando cada vez más dificultades para insertarse en la agenda de sus facultades» (Bruno-Jofré, Tröhler, 2014a, p. XIII). A su juicio, y en el mío, en el campo de la educación, y en general en la enseñanza, predomina en las últimas décadas un modelo tecnocrático cuyos conceptos y criterios básicos – eficacia, eficiencia, excelencia, estándares, evidencias empíricas,… – dejan a un lado el incontestable hecho de que la educación es una práctica política y moral en la que las palabras eficacia, eficiencia, calidad o excelencia, siempre nos remiten a preguntarnos para qué o en función de qué (Biesta, 2007, 2009). Nada tiene de extraño que, en este contexto académico-investigador, la filosofía de la educación y la historia de la educación hayan perdido terreno en la mayoría de las facultades (Bruno-Jofré, Tröhler, 2014a, p. XIII).
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Kacper Poblocki Anthropologies and Commoditization of Knowledge Whither Anthropology without Nation-state? : Interdisciplinarity, World Published by: http:www.sagepublications.com

Kacper Poblocki Anthropologies and Commoditization of Knowledge Whither Anthropology without Nation-state? : Interdisciplinarity, World Published by: http:www.sagepublications.com

between places by sending electromagnetic signals through them), agreeing on where to locate the prime meridian, the decimalization of time, and the long-fought battle to measure the exact distance between Paris and London. Following Lorentz, Einstein rejected the principle of ether, arguing that only relative speeds of moving objects could be determined, and the speed at which Earth moves through the ether is impossible to measure, thus abandoning the last objective, absolute frame of reference (vestige of the Christian and Newtonian worldview). Poincaré, unlike Einstein, never fully rejected the principle of ether, perhaps because the idea that there is no unifying substance that our world is immersed in was too horrifying to accept. Sure, he thought that time, space and frames of reference were mere ‘conventions’ subject to arbitrary decision. Yet, unlike Einstein the deliber- ate exile, he was struggling (as during the campaign to establish the prime meridian in the vicinity of Paris and not in Greenwich) to keep the tools for coordinating the global panoply of clocks in his, or rather in France’s, hands. He was a loyal subject, a French patriot, a respectable engineer and a clerk. Einstein, on the contrary, ‘was never out to repair and uphold any empire – neither the French, nor the Prussian, nor the Newtonian’ (Galison, 2003: 310). For Poincaré there was ‘local time’ as contrasted to ‘true time’. For Einstein there was only a multiplicity of local times (Galison, 2003: 317), no centre but only a plurality of time-spaces (2003: 292–3). Therefore it is an irony that, as Galison argues, Einstein continued the nationalist project of General von Moltke, who, inspired by his quick military victory over France thanks to his dextrous use of precision-synchronized trains, set out to unify the German hodgepodge of mechanical and electrical time systems as early as 1889 and to use time as the unifying tool of the hodgepodge of the German peoples (Galison, 2003: 156–9). Of course, he drew on the older military tradition of mastering the methods of ‘keeping together in time’ (McNeill, 1995) and did it while Volkskundler were working on the concept of ‘culture’ for essentially the same purposes, but only through the use of humanities.
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Vista de José Luis Cuevas and the ‘New’ Latin American Artist
							| Anales del Instituto de Investigaciones Estéticas

Vista de José Luis Cuevas and the ‘New’ Latin American Artist | Anales del Instituto de Investigaciones Estéticas

; Gilberto Aceves Navarro, September -October , ; Alberto Gironella, March -April , ; Lilia Carrillo and Manuel Felguérez, March -, , as recorded in Annick Sanjurjo (ed.), Contemporary Latin American Artists: Exhibitions at the Organization of American States,  vols., Lanham, Md., Th e Scarecrow Press,  and . For the Rup- tura movement, see Rita Eder, “La joven escuela,” and her “Las artes visuales en México de  a ,” in México, setenta y cinco años de Revolución, Mexico City, Fondo de Cultura Económica, , pp. -; Teresa del Conde, “La aparición de la ruptura,” in Un siglo de arte mexicano, -, Mexico City, Consejo Nacional para la Cultura y las Artes/Institu- to Nacional de Bellas Artes, , pp. -; Romero Keith Delmari, Tiempos de Ruptura: Juan Martín y sus pintores, Mexico City, Landucci, . Th e term “Ruptura” as a designation for the group did not come into common use until the s, although as early as  it was employed to denote the modernists’ break with social art by Luis Cardoza y Aragón, “Pintura activa” (), in Ruptura, -, Mexico City, Museo de Arte Carrillo Gil, , pp. - . Th e existential interests and tendencies of the group are explored in Juan García Ponce, Nueve pintores mexicanos, Mexico City, Era, .
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Native tours. The anthropology of travel and tourism.

Native tours. The anthropology of travel and tourism.

Representa por ello, a mi juicio, un estudio a nivel global sobre el fenómeno y la industria turística, pero atendiendo a los múltiples aspectos que a nivel local hemos de observar s[r]

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The Surviving Image: Aby Warburg and Tylorian Anthropology

The Surviving Image: Aby Warburg and Tylorian Anthropology

By recognising the need to broaden canonical models of history — narrative models, models of temporal continuity, models of objective realisation — by directing himself little by little [r]

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Tim LaHaye – Como Vencer La Depresión

Tim LaHaye – Como Vencer La Depresión

Por intermedio de su Espíritu Santo y de la enseñanza de la Biblia, Cristo golpea a la puerta de la conciencia espiritual del hombre y le dice: "He aquí yo estoy a la puerta y llam[r]

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Portable Document Format (PDF)

Portable Document Format (PDF)

is the model elaborated by David Kolb (1984) built on theory of Dewey, Lewin and Piaget. Kolb's model of teaching is well-established in the field of education since it greatly contributed to the general theory of education (Svinicki and Dixon 1987), and it is valued mainly for its high effectiveness of learning, developing skills of students to think independently and integrate what can be called two types of epistemologies (see below no 6).Psychological knowledge of the process of learning clarifies the reasons why a memory-based model results with such a low effectiveness. As it is claimed in the literature on a theory of education (andragogy), adult people’s learning is a process that looks completely different from what we know from traditional schools, not only law schools. The main and most important difference is considering the fact that persons in the process of learning are adult and have already gathered some dose of experience in their lives. That is why the proposed method of learning is directly based on the experience of learning persons. According to the model of Malcolm Knowles, adults approach learning in the same way that they solve problems and learn in the most effective way when a topic is of immediate value to them. All this means that acquiring knowledge is necessarily linked to shaping skills that make it possible to implement this knowledge. When there is no correlation of this kind, the process of learning does not take place. Experiential learning thus involves a
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el MARLI WUNDER: ENTRE HILOS, IMÁGENES Y PROCESO CREATIVO

el MARLI WUNDER: ENTRE HILOS, IMÁGENES Y PROCESO CREATIVO

Estes registros não necessariamente geram uma sequência temá- tica. Aliás, as fotos, normalmente sem título, são tiradas, impressas e guardadas. Ao serem impressas, o papel as retorna à condição de árvore, afinal, muitos dos materiais que compõem o papel foram ex- traídos de árvores. Guardar uma fotografia impressa é sinônimo de poder abrir a gaveta a qualquer momento e criar. A fotografia impres- sa deixa de ser “somente imagem” e passa a ser também matéria do mundo, papel, textura para as mãos. Cuidadosamente as fotografias são armazenadas nas gavetas. As gavetas criam intervalos. É como se a fotografia adormecesse, entrasse em estado de transformação, de pulsão de vida. Fotografia-coisa-viva, obra que é matéria, quebra da cadeia, tudo é matéria viva, tudo é processo contínuo, movimento.
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