Breast cancer survivors

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Associations between Diabetes and Quality of Life among Breast Cancer Survivors.

Associations between Diabetes and Quality of Life among Breast Cancer Survivors.

Despite the fact that a strong association between comorbidity of diabetes and QOL of breast cancer survivors was found in our study, due to the inherent limitation of cross-sectional study design, we cannot determine specific causal relationships. There are the studies that indi- cate the treatment for diabetes, for instance, the long-acting insulin analog glargine may be responsible for the association with the risk of cancer [32, 33]. Meanwhile, the chemotherapy for the treatment of breast cancer causes the increase of blood glucose [10]. In addition, we need to collect more clinical data (including prospective cohort studies of mass samples) and molecular biological evidence (for example, the test of insulin-like growth factor receptor in breast cancer samples) [34]. Further investigations are warranted to explore the mechanism of this effect.
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Sexual Dysfunction in Breast Cancer Survivors: Cross-Cultural Adaptation of the Sexual Activity Questionnaire for Use in Portugal

Sexual Dysfunction in Breast Cancer Survivors: Cross-Cultural Adaptation of the Sexual Activity Questionnaire for Use in Portugal

in larger samples may help refine the adapted version. As mentioned, it is important to note that the validation of the adapted version for Portugal was only tested in breast cancer survivors. Therefore, results cannot be extrapolated to the general population or even to patients diagnosed with other cancer types. In the future, it could be interesting to additionally test it in gynaecological cancers. One of our main findings from using the SAQ was that the prevalence of sexual dysfunction among breast cancer survivors was 24%, in line with the 29% reported in France using the same tool in a sample with similar characteristics. 38 Considering
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Estadiamento e grau de resiliência do sobrevivente ao câncer de mama Staging and resilience degree in breast cancer survivors

Estadiamento e grau de resiliência do sobrevivente ao câncer de mama Staging and resilience degree in breast cancer survivors

Objective : To assess the resilience and staging degree relating to sociodemographic factors of breast cancer survivors followed up in an oncology service. Method: Quantitative study with 112 breast cancer survivors. The variables selected were: sociodemographic; clinical staging; survival time; and resilience scale. The analysis was performed using the Epi Info 6.04 software and Fisher’s exact test. The research was approved by the Ethics Committee of the Federal University of Pelotas School of Nursing under Opinion Nº 31/2009. Results: The average age was 46.2 years, there was 60.71% of stage II cases, 81.25% were white, 40.18% had five-to eight-year schooling, 52.68% were married, 73.32% had lived in urban areas, 41.96% exhibited high resilience, and 48.21%
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A guided internet-delivered individually-tailored ACT-influenced cognitive behavioural intervention to improve psychosocial outcomes in breast cancer survivors (iNNOVBC)

A guided internet-delivered individually-tailored ACT-influenced cognitive behavioural intervention to improve psychosocial outcomes in breast cancer survivors (iNNOVBC)

Within the Third Wave of cognitive behavioural therapies, Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT), due to its model of healthy adaptation to difficult circumstances and transdiagnostic ap- proach, may be particularly useful in addressing the high levels of psychological and medical comorbidities that manifest in cancer po- pulations (Fashler et al., 2018). ACT's efficacy has been studied in several conditions, namely anxiety, depression and chronic pain and its application to the cancer setting is increasing (Hulbert-Williams et al., 2015). More recently, ACT-based internet-interventions are emerging and some positive preliminary results have been published (Low et al., 2016; Köhle et al., 2015; Arch and Mitchell, 2016; Mujcic et al., 2018; Köhle et al., 2017). Nevertheless, stronger evidence of efficacy and cost- effectiveness is needed. Thus, the present research intends to contribute to close the abovementioned research gaps by assessing the feasibility, efficacy and cost-effectiveness of iNNOVBC – a 10 weeks guided in- ternet-delivered individually-tailored ACT-influenced CBT intervention developed to improve mild to moderate anxiety and depression in Breast cancer survivors when compared to TAU in a waiting list control group (WLC).
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Physical activity and maximal aerobic capacity in breast cancer survivors: Why this is important

Physical activity and maximal aerobic capacity in breast cancer survivors: Why this is important

Breast cancer (BC) is the most frequent females’ ma- lignant solid tumor in Serbia and the leading cause of death from malignant disease among them 1, 2 . Although the num- ber of new breast cancer patients is constantly rising, thanks to early diagnosis and modern methods of treatment, the number of successfully treated patients is growing, too. Treatment of malignant diseases is associated with numerous adverse effects – physical, mental, emotional and social. Un- fortunately, these reactions are often not limited to the period of treatment, but are retained for months, even years after the treatment.
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Strength, Water Compartments and Phase Angle in Breast Cancer Survivors

Strength, Water Compartments and Phase Angle in Breast Cancer Survivors

When developing a treatment plan there are factors to consider such as the type of BC, age, menopausal status, overall health and personal preferences or situation. Other factors, regarding the tumor, need to be taken into consideration such as the stage of cancer (size of tumor and if it has spread); grade of cancer (how cancer cells look and behave); hormone receptor status (if cancer cells have receptors for estrogen and progesterone); HER2 status (HER2 is a protein on the surface of the breast cells that promotes growth). 11

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Rev. Bras. Ginecol. Obstet.  vol.37 número3

Rev. Bras. Ginecol. Obstet. vol.37 número3

The breast cancer survivors diagnosed with in situ to Stage III breast cancer in this study ranged in age from 31 to 85 years old (mean age: 54.5 years old; standard deviation – SD=10.4), and the average length of time since diagnosis was 5.2 years (SD=4.6). The comparison group ranged in age from 32 to 86 years old (mean age: 55.3 years old; SD=11.1). Additional socio‑demograph‑ ic variables are presented and compared in Table 1. Comparisons between the two groups displayed signiicant differences for educational level (p=0.003), which was greater in the comparison group, and the percentage of partnered women, which was increased in breast cancer survivors compared with the women with no cancer his‑ tory (p<0.001). Moreover, women with no cancer history displayed an increased number of comorbidities compared with survivors (p<0.001).
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Rev. Assoc. Med. Bras.  vol.59 número3

Rev. Assoc. Med. Bras. vol.59 número3

The recent article on bone mineral density in postmenopausal women with and without breast cancer was very interest- ing. Conde et al. concluded that The prevalence of abnormal bone mineral density (BMD) was higher in postmenopausal breast cancer survivors (BCS) than in postmenopausal women without breast cancer”. 1 Certainly, the concern regarding

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Einstein (São Paulo)  vol.11 número4

Einstein (São Paulo) vol.11 número4

Objective: To evaluated whether Paullinia cupana decrease number and severity of hot flashes in breast cancer survivors. Methods: This was a prospective phase II pilot study. We studied female breast cancer survivors who had completed the cancer treatment 3 months previously and who were experiencing at least 14 hot flashes per week. At least 9 of the 15 patients were required to have a decrease of at least 50% in hot flash severity score in keeping with the Simon Design. Patients received 50mg of dry extract of Paullinia cupana orally twice a day for 6 weeks. We assessed both frequency and severity of hot flashes. Results: A total of 18 patients started the Paullinia cupana treatment, and 15 completed the study. Three patients left the study immediately after starting the treatment because of personal difficulties in participation or noncompliance. Of the 15 patients who completed the study 10 had a decrease of more than 50% in hot flash severity scores. During the 6 weeks of treatment, statistically significant decreases were seen in both numbers of hot flashes (p=0.0009) and severity scores (p<0.0001). Paullinia cupana was well tolerated, and there were no instances of discontinuation because of toxicity. Conclusions: Paullinia cupana appears promising for controlling hot flashes. More extensive studies seem warranted.
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rev. educ. fis.  vol.20 número3

rev. educ. fis. vol.20 número3

The reduction in MAP observed in this study can also be in part explained by changes in BMI. The results of exploratory analyses revealed that even with the slight increase in BMI at the end of the study, BMI was signiicantly correlated to MAP. Changes in BMI accounted for 8.5% of the change in MAP. Mean arterial pressure could have also be inluenced by the decrease in %BF along with the increase in %FFM, which ex- plained the slight increase found in BMI at the end of the study. Participant muscle mass in kilograms increased from baseline (77.8 kg) to inal assessment (78.7 kg). The increase in %FFM of (~1 kg) from baseline to the end of the exercise intervention conirms the eficacy of the exercise intervention and assists in part to explain the reduction in MAP. The reduction in MAP might be explained by the metabolic active nature of lean tissue. Metabolically active tissue can result in an increase in muscle capillary density that may help reduce total peripheral resistance, which may impact overall reduction in resting blood pressure (Brooks, Fahey, & Baldwin, 2005). This is speculation on our part. Future studies can help elucidate the beneits of exercise on cardiovascular health of breast cancer survivors by examining The results of the assessment of RHR throughout the inter-
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Rev. esc. enferm. USP  vol.47 número1

Rev. esc. enferm. USP vol.47 número1

subject, since most other authors have reported worse or equal QOL for BC survivors compared to women wi- thout BC. We believe that this is the fi rst Brazilian case- -control study which has used the SF-36 in order to as- sess breast cancer survivors and women without cancer, indica ng a be er QOL in all dimensions for those who have had breast cancer. Perhaps the explana on can be given by the fact that these women have found support from their families and health professionals, and have found greater meaning in life a er cancer. Knowing that the mul factorial e ology has cancer, it is a need for fur- ther studies in other Brazilian regions assessing the QOL in pa ents with breast cancer survivors for the purpose of analysis and comparison.
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miR-221/222 targets adiponectin receptor 1 to promote the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition in breast cancer.

miR-221/222 targets adiponectin receptor 1 to promote the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition in breast cancer.

significant unmet medical need. Recently, small RNA molecules known as miRNAs have emerged as post-transcriptional regulators of mRNA stability, and have been identified to enhance several aspects of breast cancer pathogenesis including metastasis [31], invasion [32], and self-renewal [33]. Each of these phenotypes can be further modulated by the EMT program [34]. miR-221/222 has previously been reported to promote the EMT by negatively regulating TRPS1 that leads to increased ZEB2 expression [10]. Here, we found that miR-221/222 additionally targets ADIPOR1 and abrogates ADIPOR1 inhibition of the EMT. Our data show that miR-221/222 simultaneously targets two genes, ADIPOR1 and TRPS1, which likely allows for tight control of the EMT. Both the NF-kB/IL6/JAK2/STAT3 cascade, which we show here is modulated by miR-221/222-mediated downregulation of ADI- POR1, and ZEB2 expression, which we have previously shown is Figure 1. ADIPOR1 is a direct target of miR-221/222. (A) qRT-PCR analysis of MCF10A cells, 48 hours post transfection with either miR-Control or miR-221/222 mimic. Data represent means of triplicates 6 SD. (B) ADIPOR1 mRNA expression data taken from microarray analysis of 32 luminal and 23 basal-like breast cancer cell lines. Data represented as boxplot, with whiskers indicating maximum and minimum values of the data set. (C) qRT- PCR analysis of ADIPOR1 mRNA expression versus miR-221 levels in 49 breast cancer cell lines. (D) qRT-PCR analysis of ADIPOR1 mRNA expression versus miR-221 levels in 27 primary breast tumors. (E) qRT-PCR analysis of ADIPOR1 mRNA expression versus miR-222 levels in 49 breast cancer cell lines. (F) qRT-PCR analysis of ADIPOR1 mRNA expression versus miR-222 levels in 27 primary breast tumors. (G) The predicted ADIPOR1 wild-type (WT) and mutant 3’UTR sequence for miR-221/222 is shown above. Below, MCF10A cells were co-transfected with the reporter constructs and an increasing titration of miR-221/222 mimic. Data represent means of triplicates 6 SD.
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RAD51B in Familial Breast Cancer.

RAD51B in Familial Breast Cancer.

Taylor, Familial Cancer and Genetics Medicine, Royal Melbourne Hos- pital; Benjamin Thierry, Ian Wark Research Institute, University of South Australia; Ella Thompson, Cancer Genetics, Research Department, Peter MaCallum Cancer Centre; Heather Thorne, Research Department, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre; Sharron Townshend, Genetic Services of Western Australia; Alison Trainer, University of NSW, Prince of Wales Hospital; Lan Tran, Medical Psychology Unit, University of Sydney; Kathy Tucker, Heredity Cancer Clinic, Prince of Wales Hospital; Janet Tyler, Hereditary Cancer Clinic, Prince of Wales Hospi- tal; Jane Visvader, The Walter and Eliza Hall Institute of Medical Research, Royal Melbourne Hospital; Logan Walker, Molecular Cancer Epidemiology Laboratory, Queensland Institute of Medical Research, Royal Brisbane Hospital; Ian Walpole, Genetic Services of WA, King Edward Memorial Hospital; Robin Ward, Department of Medical Oncology, Prince of Wales Hospital; Paul Waring, Department of Pathology, University of WA; Bev Warner, Cabrini Hospital; Graham Warren, St Vincent's Breast Clinic; Rachael Williams, Family Cancer Clinic, St Vincent's Hospital; Judy Wilson, Royal North Shore Hospital; Ingrid Winship, Department of Genetics, Royal Melbourne Hospital; Kathy Wu, Familial Cancer Centre, Westmead Hospi- tal; Mary Ann Young, Familial Cancer Clinic, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre
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TOX3 mutations in breast cancer.

TOX3 mutations in breast cancer.

TOX3 maps to 16q12, a region commonly lost in breast cancers and recently implicated in the risk of developing breast cancer. However, not much is known of the role of TOX3 itself in breast cancer biology. This is the first study to determine the importance of TOX3 mutations in breast cancers. We screened TOX3 for mutations in 133 breast tumours and identified four mutations (three missense, one in-frame deletion of 30 base pairs) in six primary tumours, corresponding to an overall mutation frequency of 4.5%. One potentially deleterious missense mutation in exon 3 (Leu129Phe) was identified in one tumour (genomic DNA and cDNA). Whilst copy number changes of 16q12 are common in breast cancer, our data show that mutations of TOX3 are present at low frequency in tumours. Our results support that TOX3 should be further investigated to elucidate its role in breast cancer biology.
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The Pro allele of the p53 codon 72 polymorphism is associated with decreased intratumoral expression of BAX and p21, and increased breast cancer risk.

The Pro allele of the p53 codon 72 polymorphism is associated with decreased intratumoral expression of BAX and p21, and increased breast cancer risk.

The Arg72Pro SNP affects the amino acid sequence of p53, and different biochemical properties have been reported for the two resulting p53 variants [21–23,26,27]. p53 72Arg is more efficient in inducing apoptosis, whereas p53 72Pro exhibits higher DNA-repair capacity and is a stronger inducer of cell cycle arrest [8,21– 23,26,27]. Our findings are consistent with a model in which the p53 72Arg variant is a more potent tumor suppressor than p53 72Pro , presumably mainly due to inducing target genes with a key role in apoptosis and cell cycle arrest more efficiently. Consistent with this model, the supposably weaker tumor suppressor p53 72Pro was associated with an increased breast cancer risk (Table 2). An increased breast cancer risk associated with the Pro-allele has also been found by several previous studies [28,29,50]. However, most of the larger studies and meta-analyses did not find the Arg72Pro SNP to be associated with breast cancer risk [31,33,35–41]. This SNP exhibits pronounced differences in allele frequencies as a function of geographical latitude, the Arg-allele becoming progressively more frequent the further North a population resides, and it has been suggested that this may confound association studies if the study population is recruited from more than one geographical area [42,43].
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Association between alcohol consumption and cancers in the Chinese population--a systematic review and meta-analysis.

Association between alcohol consumption and cancers in the Chinese population--a systematic review and meta-analysis.

Assessment of heterogeneity and data synthesis The definitions of drinker and non-drinker were complex and varied widely between studies. In this review, we took participants described as drinking the smallest amount and those who said that they never drink as ‘‘non-drinkers’’, while the rest of the subjects were classified into the ‘‘drinker’’ category. A qualitative meta- analysis was conducted by summarizing, comparing and contrast- ing the abstracted data. We calculated the pooled ORs for case- control studies and the RRs for cohort studies separately using RevMan 5.0 software. Heterogeneity was evaluated using the Q test [23] and the I-squared statistic [24]. If the level of heterogeneity was acceptable (p.0.10, or p#0.10 but I 2 #50%), the meta-analysis was conducted using a fixed effects model. If significant heterogeneity was found (p#0.10, I 2 .50%), a random effects model was used for the meta-analysis. Subgroup analyses were also performed to explore the possible reasons for the heterogeneity. Additionally, sensitivity analyses were undertaken to evaluate the stability of the relationship between alcohol consumption and cancer.
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Depression and Anxiety Disorders among Hospitalized Women with Breast Cancer.

Depression and Anxiety Disorders among Hospitalized Women with Breast Cancer.

Evidence about the association between depression and survival in cancer populations, has been inconsistent [12,45–49]. Recent meta-analytic analyses of data from prospective studies of patients with various types of cancer concluded that depression at the time of diagnosis is asso- ciated with increased mortality [12,13]. However, the majority of studies included mixed pa- tient samples with various tumors, and differences in the timing and nature of depression assessment. The majority of existing studies using self-reported questionnaires failed to identify an association between depression and survival [50–54]. In contrast, two studies based on clini- cian diagnoses using ICD-8 [55] and ICD-9 [19] codes demonstrated significant relationships between depression and survival in breast cancer patients, such that a diagnosis of depression was associated with a 1.3–1.4-fold decrease in survival [19,55]. Our observation that hospital- ized breast cancer patients were less likely than hospitalized controls to be diagnosed with de- pression and anxiety, and that breast cancer patients who were diagnosed were less likely to experience in-hospital mortality suggests the need for a better and more integrated cancer care approach. However, not all hospitals have the necessary resources to provide oncology and mental health services. This may have contributed to our observation that breast cancer mor- tality was higher among residents outside of large metropolitan areas, further highlighting the importance of developing an integrated strategy at the institutional level to ensure that both the physical and mental health needs of cancer patients are considered.
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Clinics  vol.66 número6

Clinics vol.66 número6

Genomic DNA was isolated from peripheral blood (n = 99) and non-tumor breast tissue (n = 29) according to standard procedures. 16 TP53 polymorphisms were detected by amplifying genomic DNA with primers previously described. 17 XRCC1 polymorphisms were assessed by PCR-RFLP as previously described. 18 We were unable to genotype eight samples for TP53 polymorphisms and three for XRCC1 polymorphisms. To ensure the quality of our genotyping results, all genotypes were confirmed by sequencing after PCR during the standardization of the method.

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Cytogenetic evaluation of 20 primary breast carcinomas

Cytogenetic evaluation of 20 primary breast carcinomas

Breast cancer is the most common neoplasm and the leading cause of cancer related deaths among women in most countries (PARKIN et al. The natural history of breast cancer va[r]

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POLIMORFISMO NO GENE HER2 NO CANCRO DA MAMA E DO OVÁRIO

POLIMORFISMO NO GENE HER2 NO CANCRO DA MAMA E DO OVÁRIO

O cancro da mama é a neoplasia que afecta mais mulheres no mundo (Stewart e Kleihues, 2003), com mais de um milhão de novos casos por ano (Baselga e Norton, 2002). Segundo a IARC {International Agency for Research on Cancer), estima-se que a taxa de incidência desta neoplasia no ano de 2000 terá sido de 35,7 por 100000 habitantes (ASR - Age Standardized Rate) (Ferlay et ai., 2001). No entanto, existem diferenças consideráveis nas taxas de incidência e mortalidade entre variados países (figura 7). O risco deste tipo de neoplasia é consideravelmente mais elevado na América do Norte e nos
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